• Title: Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Sue Hamilton
  • ISBN: 9780192853745
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Paperback
  • Indian Philosophy A Very Short Introduction India has a long rich and diverse tradition of philosophical thought spanning some two and a half millennia and encompassing several major religious traditions In this intriguing introduction to In
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millennia and encompassing several major religious traditions In this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status Sue Hamilton explores how thIndia has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millennia and encompassing several major religious traditions In this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian concepts, such as karma and rebirth She also explains how Indian thinkers have understood issues of reality and knowledge issues that are also an important part of the Western philosophical tradition About the Series Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life s most interesting topics Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.

    One Reply to “Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. This is an especially dense Very Short Introduction, compressing its vast field into a 35,000-word neutron star of information. I found I had to take it slowly, despite the fact that the writing is clear and well-ordered. Hamilton takes the decision to leave most key terminology untranslated, a decision I approve of, but it does leave the novice facing some pretty daunting discussions on things like svabhāva, or jñāna-kāṇḍa. Where other introductory books might write that ‘matter is se [...]

    2. The Multifarious Inbred MonsterSankara's Advaita Vedanta is perhaps the best known of Indian ‘philosophies.’ It was the first to be exported to and propounded in the West, being presented by the Vedantin practitioner Vivekananda at the World Council of Religions in Chicago in 1893 as ‘Hinduism’, and subsequently established in various centres, such as ‘Ramakrishna Missions’, in many Western countries. It has since enjoyed such a high profile worldwide that not only do outsiders often [...]

    3. I am a big fan of the entire "Very Short Introduction' series, and have read several dozens of them. However, even in that field of mostly outstanding introductory books, this one stands out. I cannot give it enough praise. This is an eminently readable yet extremely intellectually stimulating book. It manages to convey the full richness and subtlety of Indian philosophical tradition, or at least as much of it as can fit in this format. Hamilton takes us through the historical development of the [...]

    4. Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions #47), Sue HamiltonIndia has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millennia and encompassing several major religious traditions. In this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to under [...]

    5. The author wishes to demolish an old myth that the Indian tradition is 'mystical' and 'spiritual' in contrast to the Western 'logical' and 'rational' tradition. She is right to do so, as this is quite as patronizing to the Western religious traditions (whether Judaeo-Christian or pagan) as it is to the Indian philosophical ones, but come as no surprise to me (do not all people at all times ask questions about the strange and inexplicable phenomenon of existence?), so it was somewhat tedious. Ind [...]

    6. As someone who is not philosophically inclined, I find it very hard going to understand the larger issues of the book, much less the concepts that were specific to India. That being said, if I had to know about the topic in greater depth, I'd reread the book since it is a concise ("short" having some negative connotations that the entire V.S.I. series belies) means of approaching the subject in a limited amount of time.

    7. Very insightful for us westerners who aren't exposed to Indian philosophy as much. Surprising how many similarities there are between Eastern and Western thinking when you look back in history.

    8. Nice introduction that knows its job and does it fairly well without much western references and analogy.

    9. This is a remarkably concise and clear introduction to the major schools of Indian philosophy. It is a very dense and lean text; there is almost no filler here. There are a few photographs, and a handful of chronologies. The rest is straight-up and down to business: from ancient Vedic ritual to the logic of Nyaya to the qualified nondualism of Ramanuja, Hamilton gives a brief but clear overview of wildly differing points of view. This isn't easy reading because it isn't overly simplified, but ta [...]

    10. As with most philosophy books, Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction is dry. That's why I set it aside.I started to read this book to re-enforce what I learned about Indian philosophy in a lecture series sponsored by one of the local temples. I plan to pick it again, as I have enrolled in an online introductory course on Hinduism which has a lecture on Hindu religious philosophy.

    11. الكتاب كان مدخلًا جيدًا في الفلسفة الهندية و طرقها و مدارسها و بداياتها و آرائها و تطوراتها في عدة مراحل من البراهمة و حتى البوذيين الكتاب موجز و قصير نسبيًا و فتح لي أفق جديد في الفلسفة ، ينقص الكتاب الكثير من المادة و التوسع و التوضيح و الشرح و قد قيمت الكتاب بثلاثة نجوم للم [...]

    12. As others have commented below, it's definitely not a good book for beginners philosophy. But she really does do a great job in distinguishing the religious from the philosophical & how it came about in the debates over time of classical development of India.

    13. This is a dense but readable introduction to Indian philosophy. Introducing Indian philosophy is not easy because of her rich and diverse tradition. This very short introduction gives a flavour of that tradition to reader.

    14. Really great information told in a concise tone. I enjoyed the intro and look forward to reading more.

    15. a little bit too fast and difficult to make sens about what i am reading, but it's the main feature of this kind of introduction book.

    16. Worth reading; especially the sections on early Buddhist thought and the eminent thinker Nagarjuna.

    17. Very good overview of the history and different branches of Indian philosophy. The concepts were challenging to learn and left me wanting to learn more.

    18. i read this from a yoga perspective - and i understood a lot of things in raja yoga far better after reading this little book :)

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