• Title: The Diamond Sutra
  • Author: Red Pine
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Diamond Sutra Zen Buddhism is often said to be a practice of mind to mind transmission without reliance on texts in fact some great teachers forbid their students to read or write But Buddhism has also inspired so
    Zen Buddhism is often said to be a practice of mind to mind transmission without reliance on texts in fact, some great teachers forbid their students to read or write But Buddhism has also inspired some of the greatest philosophical writings of any religion, and two such works lie at the center of Zen The Heart Sutra, which monks recite all over the world, and The DiamZen Buddhism is often said to be a practice of mind to mind transmission without reliance on texts in fact, some great teachers forbid their students to read or write But Buddhism has also inspired some of the greatest philosophical writings of any religion, and two such works lie at the center of Zen The Heart Sutra, which monks recite all over the world, and The Diamond Sutra, said to contain answers to all questions of delusion and dualism This is the Buddhist teaching on the perfection of wisdom and cuts through all obstacles on the path of practice As Red Pine explains The Diamond Sutra may look like a book, but it s really the body of the Buddha It s also your body, my body, all possible bodies But it s a body with nothing inside and nothing outside It doesn t exist in space or time Nor is it a construct of the mind It s no mind And yet because it s no mind, it has room for compassion This book is the offering of no mind, born of compassion for all suffering beings Of all the sutras that teach this teaching, this is the diamond.

    One Reply to “The Diamond Sutra ”

    1. This book starts with a translation of the Diamond Cutter Perfection of Wisdom Sutra. The rest includes some commentary of the author's own, with liberal quotations from other commentaries and from other Buddhist and Daoist writings that have something to do with the point. The sutra is the Buddha's talk with one of his disciples about how bodhisattvas should think. It taught me that the basic idea that seems so central to Zen and so weird to me, that nothing is true or false, is not unique to i [...]

    2. fucking confusing and very scholarly and yet a very definitive exploration of this central buddhist text which is essentially a two thousand year old treaty on the theory of relativity and its application to the notion of saintliness and charity, contains both Sanskrit, Japanese and Chinese translations.

    3. A sutra is a summary of something which can be relatively easily memorized, kind of like a poem. This is a discussion of a sutra of a gathering of Buddhists who are talking about philosophical issues. For example, "If there were as many rivers as there are grains of sand in the great river of Ganges, would the number of grains of sand in all those rivers be great?" Kind of like, "Are there different levels of infinity?" Although I think that there are benefits of Buddhism, especially in meditati [...]

    4. The Diamond Sutra is the sutra on non-attachment or the perfection of wisdom. That, of course, is putting it simply, as only Buddhists can do. I studied this book on and off for 6 months and I will continue to come back to it as being definitive on the subject. The gift this book gave me, was all the times it lead me to look something else up or read some other writing which gives a layer to the book that I love. Recommended, anything Red Pine.

    5. The Diamond sutra answered the questions, how should they walk, and how should they control their thoughts.

    6. I was initially confused by the place and characters names in this book. But a few YouTube videos later I can appreciate the wisdom is this short but deep book.

    7. The Diamond Sutra is a spiritual treasure and a key text of Mahayana Buddhism. Estimates for its date of composition range from the second century B.C. to the third century A.D. The original texts are in Chinese and Sanskrit. There are two related explanations for the title "Diamond Sutra": 1. the teaching of the sutra cuts through diamonds or 2. the sutra itself is the diamond that in its radiance and strength cuts through and illuminates everything. The text consists of 32 chapters (the chapte [...]

    8. The Diamond Sutra is a historical recording of a conversation between Buddha and one of his followers. The text focuses around the Buddhist philosophy of prajnaparamita, or the perfection of wisdom. It begins by Subhuti asking for guidance on how to control his thoughts. In answering they discuss the nature and perception of reality. In the sutra Buddha says this teaching is the most important and can directly lead to someone reaching Buddhahood. As one of the most important Mahayana Buddhists t [...]

    9. I wish that I could give my other books 4 stars because I have read this text. It is truth in writing by my understanding of neurological and metaphysical reality modeling. "like a tiny drop off dew upon the grass, or a bubble floating in a stream, a flash of lightening in a summer's cloud, a ghost, a shadow or a stream; so all of conditioned existence is to be seen"

    10. This is probably my favorite of the prajnaparamita sutras. Red Pine provides a very accessible translation, and justifies everything he does with an exhaustive list of references. I found his commentary, as well as his liberal use of referential, often reverent, use of quoted material from other commentators insightful and of great use.

    11. I suppose it isn't possible to see precisely which of the Buddha's sutras are most important. If you're Buddhist, you want to read them all. But this one is certainly the one that best advances the idea of emptiness of mind that is so essential to tai chi practice.

    12. This is a wonderful sutra, and the commentary is so deep and wide-ranging. I feel like I could study this one sutra forever, with just this book.UPDATE (2013): I return to this sutra and Red Pine's commentaries again and again.

    13. The wealth of Chinese and Indian commentaries drawn together by Red Pine help to elucidate and explain this fundamental dharma text on the perfection of wisdom.

    14. I read the one by thich nhat tanh and it really informed me:' the leaf, is the mother of the tree '

    15. Another great translation by Red Pine with his method of seamlessly incorporating commentary from the great Chinese Masters!

    16. Started reading this every other day - just makes a complete difference with the way my life is heading, what I focus on, everyone should stop clamoring and meditate!

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