• Title: Taking Leave of God
  • Author: Don Cupitt
  • ISBN: 9780334028406
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback
  • Taking Leave of God This was the book which first garnered international celebrity and notoriety for its author and which fire started a debate about the supernatural claims of Christianity Rejecting Christian doctrines
    This was the book which first garnered international celebrity and notoriety for its author and which fire started a debate about the supernatural claims of Christianity Rejecting Christian doctrines and metaphysics in favour of the religious consciousness which characterises human identity, Cupitt takes leave of God by abandoning objective theism Because he remained aThis was the book which first garnered international celebrity and notoriety for its author and which fire started a debate about the supernatural claims of Christianity Rejecting Christian doctrines and metaphysics in favour of the religious consciousness which characterises human identity, Cupitt takes leave of God by abandoning objective theism Because he remained an ordained priest of the Church of England, the author attracted considerable attention and criticism for his position Indeed, Keith Ward, now Oxford s Regius Professor of Divinity, wrote an entire book Holding Fast to God which attempted to counter Cupitt s views Whatever one thinks of the author s beliefs, Taking Leave of God contributed to one of the most important theological discussions of its time.

    One Reply to “Taking Leave of God”

    1. Don Cupitt beacme a notorius figure within the Church of England at the point that he wrote this. His aim is justifying religious belief and behaviour for those who can no longer believe in traditional belief in God but still feel religious or want to follow a religious path - a sceptical believer. A path he describes as "Buddhist in form, Christian in content". As he writes in the preface, "if you do not feel the pressures that have led me to the position described, then this book is not for yo [...]

    2. Ugh, this has got to be the longest 180 pages I've ever read. In the rare spots that I was able to figure out what the hell he was talking about, the points he was making were pretty trivial. The few spots that he was clear were slightly humorous and interesting, but this was rare.I think, I guess, this book is about the need for mythology, particularly Christian mythology. Sure, it's mythology, he says, and we know that now. But it's still useful if we just go ahead and treat it as mythology. F [...]

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