• Title: Indian School Days
  • Author: Basil Johnston
  • ISBN: 9780806126104
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Paperback
  • Indian School Days This book is the humorous bitter sweet autobiography of a Canadian Ojibwa who was taken from his family at age ten and placed in Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario It was when the feared
    This book is the humorous, bitter sweet autobiography of a Canadian Ojibwa who was taken from his family at age ten and placed in Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario It was 1939 when the feared Indian agent visited Basil Johnston s family and removed him and his four year old sister to St Peter Claver s school, run by the priests in a community known as Spanish, 7This book is the humorous, bitter sweet autobiography of a Canadian Ojibwa who was taken from his family at age ten and placed in Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario It was 1939 when the feared Indian agent visited Basil Johnston s family and removed him and his four year old sister to St Peter Claver s school, run by the priests in a community known as Spanish, 75 miles from Sudbury Spanish It was a word synonymous with residential school, penitentiary, reformatory, exile, dungeon, whippings, kicks, slaps, all rolled into one, Johnston recalls But despite the aching loneliness, the deprivation, the culture shock and the numbing routine, his story is engaging and compassionate Johnston creates marvelous portraits of the young Indian boys who struggled to adapt to strange ways and unthinking, unfeeling discipline Even the Jesuit teachers, whose flashes of humor occasionally broke through their stern demeanor, are portrayed with an understanding born of hindsight.

    One Reply to “Indian School Days”

    1. In 2005, the Canadian Federal Government and the representatives of Canada's First Nations arrived at $1.9 billion settlement package to for members of the First Nations who had attended the residential schools operated under the guidance of the Federal Ministry of Indian Affairs and consequently suffered abuse. The fact that such a settlement was agreed to indicates that physical and psychological abuse did indeed occur in the schools up until the time the last ones were closed in 1998 to be re [...]

    2. After reading Basil JohnstonsMermaids and Medicine Women: Native Myths and Legends I went on to read Manitous: The Spiritual World Of The Ojibway. Intrigued to read more, I discovered that he had written his memoirs of his time in a residential school in the 1930s and 40s. Although Johnston does not mention any incidences of sexual abuse, it is still heart wrenching reading about how he and his school mates were taken away from their families, often not seeing them again for years. In spite of t [...]

    3. This was good. Interesting--different from what I thought it was going to be, and like, in a good way. I thought this was going to be like, super academic and boring, but it wasn't. It was an actually very engagingly written memoir, and I really enjoyed it. It was a good time, man.

    4. Anishnabe scholar Basil H. Johnston's account of his days as a student at Spanish Indian Residential School is the premise for this book. Stolen from their grandmother's home, Johnston and his younger sister Marilyn were each sent their separate ways. The first two-thirds of the book looks at his time spent at St. Peter Claver's, and as is typical of Johnston's writing style, are filled with humorous, although emotional, depictions of the pain and suffering that the students had to endure during [...]

    5. An amazing autobiography - while Johnston's account is infused with humour, underneath lies an emotionally devastating portrayal of the residential school experience - Johnston is a gentle storyteller but that doesn't mean that he fails to portray the world of Garnier Indian Residential as anything other than soul-destroying

    6. Extremely memorable. This book really opened my eyes as to how the native American children were taken from their families and the hardships they endured at these boarding schools.

    7. Basil Johnston was, with his four-year-old sister Marilyn, effectively kidnapped in 1939 by an Indian agent who had decided, with a local priest, that the Johnston kids' mother and grandmother couldn't possibly cope with five children, especially after their mother and father had separated. Like many Native waifs, orphans, and children of broken homes in his area of northern Ontario, Basil was sent to St. Peter Claver's Indian Residential School (from 1945 on, the Garnier Residential School) and [...]

    8. Although, it has been some time, I've read Ojibway Heritage by Basil Johnston, therefore, i expected something a bit different in terms of voice.

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