• Title: The First World War: A New Illustrated History
  • Author: Hew Strachan
  • ISBN: 9780743239615
  • Page: 277
  • Format: Paperback
  • The First World War A New Illustrated History The author explores such theatres as the Balkans Africa and the Ottoman Empire He assesses Britain s participation in the First World War in the light of what became a struggle for the defense of lib
    The author explores such theatres as the Balkans, Africa and the Ottoman Empire He assesses Britain s participation in the First World War in the light of what became a struggle for the defense of liberalism He shows how the war shaped the short 20th century that followed it.

    One Reply to “The First World War: A New Illustrated History”

    1. With the centennial of the onset of World War 1 upon us, I sought and found in this 2004 book a good choice for a one-volume history of the whole shebang. It is highly compressed into 340 pages, but is not wanting for covering the war in its world-wide aspect. With such a scope, we lose out on in-depth character assessment of major figures, but there are too many of them anyway. What we get instead is an effective framework of interpretation for hanging a lot of the facts and factions and sites [...]

    2. I had seen the TV series that this book was based on and had to admit to myself that that was all I had to offer in terms of knowledge on the subject. So the book was going to be hopefully a more than useful beginner’s guide and it has turned out to be so. Each chapter was full of subject matter that made me realise I need to dig deeper into the Great War. The book itself covers mostly the political events and the major battles with the cultural events hardly covered. Fair enough I suppose. 33 [...]

    3. I wish I could rate this higher for what it does right, in particular Strachan's emphasis on events outside of the western front. However, his detached and judgmental style is grating. He likes to poke holes in "misconceptions" with such glee that he often fails to explain why the accepted view is wrong. This also makes it a rather poor introduction to the war, for it often assumes ample prior knowledge. The most intriguing assertion is that the rejection of the First World War's "true" meaning [...]

    4. An outstanding single-volume history and a remarkable feat of distillation and synthesis. When the 340 pages are finished, you're almost left feeling like it was too short. Serious students of history will be a little annoyed at the light sourcing, particularly when it comes to Strachan's confident dismissals of the conventional wisdom. A few of the conclusions seem a little too trite and one or two observations even flatly ludicrous, as here: "given that the United States was itself a community [...]

    5. Buku ini merupakan sebuah buku sejarah satu jilid (volume) mengenai Perang Dunia Pertama (1914 - 1918). Perang ini turut dikenali sebagai The Great War,yang bermula pada 28 Julai 1914 sehingga 11 November 1918. Walaupun bermula di benua Eropah dan memainkan peranan utama,skala peperangan melangkaui benua tersebut. Malah,peperangan ini turut melibatkan benua-benua yang lain seperti di Asia dan Afrika.Saya berpandangan bahawa buku ini merupakan sebuah buku ilmiah yang baik untuk dibaca. Terutamany [...]

    6. World War I is my favorite war: poison gas, flamethrowers, nun beating--everything I cherish in life came into use for the first time as a method of warfare and terror-inducing. The first mechanized war! The first clumsy, bomb-dropping airships! Moustaches! Trench mouth! And this is easily the best single volume history I've read of itTackling as broad a subject as World War I and confining it into one, readable volume might seem nigh impossible, but I'd say Strachan managed to pull it off here. [...]

    7. Strachan spent years researching and writing this book labeled Volume I: To Arms. I gave up at page 382 of 1139. I felt like I was interrupting the author and reading his notes over his shoulder. It seemed like every discussion by every office-bound was detailed; every turn of every unit of the multitude of armies was mentioned by commander and cardinal direction. You cannot even tell which country the units represent when in the Russian-German front the commanders of two groups on the same side [...]

    8. Catching up on some of my off and on reading. This book was available for Nook download not long ago at $5, so I opted to try.I would say that along with John Keegan's The First World War, one of the better one volume histories of the war. The writing is clearly better than Keegan's. The narrative is more lively and in the moment. Although I enjoyed the book, I still have not found a better book on World War 1 than Paul Fussell's The Great War and Modern Memory. For me, that book is the gold sta [...]

    9. Tanto per cambiare, eccessivamente anglocentrico.Certamente interessante, anche ben scritto, ma troppo orientato solo e soltanto sul fronte occidentale (senza dubbio il fronte più importante) o laddove hanno combattuto gli inglesi. Scarsi (troppo, veramente troppo) i riferimenti al fronte italiano o a quello orientale.

    10. It's basically a cliff's - notes of World War I. There is a lot of information and much of it is interesting, but the writing is so dry. It almost took me the same amount of time to read this as it did to read The Sleepwalkers and that book is almost twice as long. This book is okay, but the accompanying video series is much much better. I also don't know if I agree with Strachan's assessment that the war in general, or the Treaty of Versailles in particular, didn't make the second world war ine [...]

    11. I finished this book on Armistice Day! How fitting. This book was chosen as the anchor for my class on WWI but I'm not sure that it's the best book to use when learning about the subject. To me it seemed to focus on vague specific topics in not so much of a chronological order. For a short history on WWI I felt like it should cover the basics a little better giving you an idea of the who's and what's in the order in which they happened.

    12. Excellent one-volume history of WW1, comparable to Andrew Roberts' work on WW2. Highly recommended- especially for those unfamiliar with the subject.

    13. I read The First World War by Hew Strachan mostly because it was recommended by the Army Chief of Staff.  I also realized that my knowledge of WWI is woefully inept considering I have a history degree.  I took a class on World War II and the US Civil War.  There are dozens of movies about WWII and the Civil War.  We joke about the days in which the History Channel showed only profiles of Hitler, as opposed to Ancient Aliens, as a sign of the times.  Outside of of the tales of Diana, Princes [...]

    14. Having read several books about World War I since the 100th anniversary of its outbreak in 1914, my immediate response to seeing this was 'why would I want to read another one'? But there was something about its conciseness that drew me to it - many other books on the war are very long. It wasn't just the conciseness of its 330 pages; a quick browse showed that Hew Strachan's writing style was also concise. But most of all, I was drawn in by his central thesis that characterisatiuons of World Wa [...]

    15. Like many of the other readers who posted comments, I am impressed by Hew Strachan's mastery of so many of the intimate details of the War. I had little real background on World War I and wanted to learn much more. I was interested to see Mr Strachan refute the notion, which I've always heard, that the War caused a lost generation when in fact population recovered by mid 1920's (at Introduction on very first page). I also was interested to see Mr Strachan's explanation that defensive trench warf [...]

    16. Strachan does an excellent job in covering the war without going into too much detail in any one area: politics, military strategy, individual battles, and so on. I was surprised to learn how much of WWI took place in other parts of the world and involved so many people from nations outside Europe and the US—I've always envisioned the British, French, and Germans in trenches in France, which is such a limited view of the scope of this war. Strachan also conveys the sense of futility of WWI and [...]

    17. Good book with lots of depth on the behind the scenes of he war. This is not a book about the battles. Which is just what I was looking for. If any criticism can be made, it reads more like a text book than a novel. Again, not bad. This is a history book after all. If your looking for a history of World War One, behind the scenes, and not about battles, tactics, strategies, then this is the book for you.

    18. Strachan has written a nice compact history of the First World War. I have read better works, but then again I have read some works that couldn’t hold a candle to this work. Strachan does nice work that covers all fronts of the War to end all Wars. I recommend this work for all interested in the First World War or for some The Great War

    19. A clear, insightful, and direct summary of the war, covering all fronts (though the Western and Eastern in more detail than others). Very well-written and enjoyable to read, this book would be a great starting point for anyone who wants to gain an overview of the conflict.

    20. Solid one volume history. Paints with a broad brush and makes some statements assumed to be facts without supporting evidence but doesn't detract from the overall sufficiency of the work as intended.

    21. Pretty decent one-volume history of the war, although the author's style often got in the way of any transfer of knowledge

    22. Yet another history. This focuses in large part on the global aspects of the war, in addition to trying to explaining the conflict in terms that the combatants understood — the conflict between liberalism and authoritatism. In the author’s view, the war wasn’t fought for meaningless reasons, and he asserts that the later view of it as a senseless carnage is a product of poets and authors writing during the 1920’s.

    23. The worst part about the book was the maps; Terribly simplistic and it was very hard to follow with many of the details mentioned in the book. I would recommend an online website with proper maps to augment the book. In the general the book is good with reasonable emphasis on many of the war's aspect. I read many books about WWI, Strachan's gives great information about the status of the internal front using sources such as sensors reports, shipping data that I found to be of great value. Anothe [...]

    24. Much has already been said about this little volume, so I'll keep my own comments brief. This was a fairly good, short introduction to the war that's only flaw was to try to touch on everything which led to nothing being covered in detail. For all of that it was very well written and engaging.Strachan showed the links between the home fronts, the social issues, the economy and the fighting at the front. Everything was linked, how else could it be in a modern industrial 'Total War'? The war in Af [...]

    25. A very good introduction to the 1st World War. Stachan makes some very good points and he deals with the issue of the origins of the war very well. He argues that the war was no inevitable and that the build of the German navy was as much as a pawn to convince Britian to ally with Germany, as it was deemed to be a threat, and as such a cause for war.He makes a repeated attack on the euro-centric view of the war, as the war is seemed wholly related to the western front. Here was a war that had ma [...]

    26. The greatest strengths of Strachan's book are his extensive coverage of the non-western fronts and the plethora of photographs. Instead of the usual practice of placing all the photos in the center, Strachan's has black-and-white photographs placed liberally throughout. The central plates have a number of color photos, which is surprising given the time period. One could argue that the photos inflate the page count some, but they add a lot to the book, have detailed captions to put them in conte [...]

    27. Jeg havde store forventninger til denne bog, da jeg i længere tid har haft interesse for 1. Verdenskrig. Men hvilken skuffelse. Bogen præges af en arrogant og kold tone, der i hvert fald med tydelighed viser forfatterens glæde ved krig og militærhistorie. Det er en bog, hvor generaler og forsvarets top spiller en meget afgørende rolle. Der er også fokus på politiske beslutninger og diplomatiet (som er en af bogens stærkere sider), men der er meget lidt om de folk, der rent faktisk kæmpe [...]

    28. This is an excellent survey text of the subject, which integrates many elements traditionally ignored by writers of popular history. It is also one of the most extensively illustrated academic texts you will ever see, making it a particularly effective teaching tool. There is a set of color plates in the center which are particularly striking, but nearly every page has a black and white photo that ties neatly in with the text and gives readers a visual image of the situations described.Strachan [...]

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