• Title: The Fifth Queen
  • Author: Ford Madox Ford A.S. Byatt
  • ISBN: 9780307744913
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Fifth Queen Now back in print Ford s highly acclaimed portrait of Henry VIII s controversial fifth QueenThis masterful performance of historical fiction centers on Katharine Howard clever beautiful and outspok
    Now back in print, Ford s highly acclaimed portrait of Henry VIII s controversial fifth QueenThis masterful performance of historical fiction centers on Katharine Howard clever, beautiful, and outspoken who catches the jaded eye of Henry VIII and becomes his fifth Queen Corruption and fear pervade the King s court, and the dimly lit corridors vibrate with the intriguesNow back in print, Ford s highly acclaimed portrait of Henry VIII s controversial fifth QueenThis masterful performance of historical fiction centers on Katharine Howard clever, beautiful, and outspoken who catches the jaded eye of Henry VIII and becomes his fifth Queen Corruption and fear pervade the King s court, and the dimly lit corridors vibrate with the intrigues of unscrupulous courtiers hungry for power Soon Katharine is locked in a vicious battle with Thomas Cromwell, the Lord Privy Seal, as she fights for political and religious change.Ford saw the past as an integral part of the present experience and understanding, and his sharply etched vision of the court of Henry VIII first published in 1908 echoes aspects of Edwardian England as it explores the pervading influence of power, lies, fear, and anxiety on people s lives.

    One Reply to “The Fifth Queen”

    1. Originally published in the 60's, long before Phillipa Gregory, Ford Madox Ford was cooking up stories about the Desperate Housewives of Windsor Castle.

    2. Very different- a modernist take on historical fiction- but very interesting. Highly recommended if you're already familiar with the style.

    3. In this novel (or trio of novellas, to be more accurate) written in the early 1900s, Ford Madox Ford set himself a challenge, to write a novel of Tudor England in a style that sought to re-create the language of the actual time period. The book that resulted is not the easiest for modern readers to digest, and judging from the work of some of his contemporaries, probably would have been a tough read even a century ago. The text is exceedingly spare in non-dialog content, often subsuming such in [...]

    4. Written in 1926. The story of Katherine Howard and her entry into the court of Henry VIII.Is some respects Ford Madox Ford reminds me of Hilary Mantel. He uses an impressionistic technique of building up a collage of scenes and vignettes to produce a picture of a cold, dark, dirty and dangerous court where Thomas Cromwell is fighting to keep control in the aftermath of the fiasco of Henry's marriage to Ann of Cleves. Cromwell places Katherine, a papist, the court of Mary Tudor, as an unwilling s [...]

    5. Es una chulada leer libros históricos, y es que cuando te adentras a la vida de la realeza puedes darte cuenta que no se necesita ficción por que la vida real tiene un montón de drama digna de libros.En fin, "La quinta Reina" narra la historia de Catalina Howard la quinta esposa del rey de Inglaterra, el famoso Enrique VIII, Ford Madox Fox te envuelve en una narrativa fácil de leer llena de drama, intriga y ¿amor?, el libro me ha parecido bueno obviamente cuando se leen estos libros de entr [...]

    6. After a brief moment of hesitation at the start, I found this a wonderful piece of fiction. I came to it via The Good Soldier and Parades End: fully prepared therefore to find myself reading a masterpiece. I was fleetingly disappointed over those first few chapters. But not for long. Once I got into his rhythm, he swept me away. My God, the man could write. His prose simply sweeps you along and you begin to believe every word he uses, painting his picture of the court in Tudor times. It feels so [...]

    7. "I thought, this a virtue-mad Queen. She shall most likely fall!"You won't find many history books accusing Katherine Howard of being virtue-mad, much as her mistress, The Lady ('Bloody') Mary, does in the final part of Ford's trilogy about Henry's fifth queen. Far from it, in fact. History suggests that Howard was a flighty, frivolous young woman, a good-time girl who was unfaithful to the king, taking a lover in the dashing Thomas Culpepper as soon as Henry's back was turned, swiftly losing he [...]

    8. SO I usually do not write a review until I'm finished with the book, but I am posting at over halfway through that I love Historical Fiction and detest historical language.Well I finished it and still didn't really like it. I did find the political manuverings interesting, but knowing the fact that Kat Howard was nothing like this written version really kept my BS meter up and took me out of the story everytime she spoke.

    9. A bit too old-fashioned for me, the dialogue was too gadzooks and methinks for me to really enjoy. I recognize that historical fiction has changed quite a bit since Ford's time, but I just couldn't get much further than most of the way through the first book.

    10. Hard to keep up with all the plots and counter plots. Looking forward to Elizabeth Klett recording for Librivox the next two books in the trilogy.

    11. I won this book in a good reads first reads giveaway contest. I'm really looking forward to reading this book as I am a big fan of the tudors.

    12. Much is awash with historical bumff about the Tudors: biographies, scholarly works, novels, and movies, plays, TV min-series, and now with Hilary Mantel's ongoing triology concerning the life, career and rise of Thomas Cromwell (Wolf Hall, etc), shows what a popular and enduring epoch the dynasty is.And this is what makes Ford Madox Ford's novels about Henry VIII's fifth queen, Katherine Howard, interesting. I stumbled on the trilogy while doing a bit of browsing on Gutenberg and immediately pop [...]

    13. An imaginative historical romance with imitators even today, more than 100 years after the book was published. After reading his two acknowledged masterpieces, The Good Soldier and Parade's End, I've never understood why Ford is among the English language's underrated writers.

    14. fan fictionI listened to the librivox audiobook. The reader, Elizabeth Alert, was great as usual, but the story was far from factual.

    15. The Fifth Queen by English novelist Ford Madox Ford was originally a trilogy. It consists of three novels, The Fifth Queen; And How She Came to Court (1906), Privy Seal (1907) and The Fifth Queen Crowned (1908), which present a highly fictionalised account of Katharine Howard's life and her death. A really highly fictionalised account. I liked his style of writing, it wasn't at all confusing and kept me interested, except for the sentences throw in very often in Latin. I know about ten words of [...]

    16. Ford Madox Ford’s trilogy about the doomed Katharine Howard, fifth queen of Henry VIII, is a fine novel deserving of more attention. Kat Howard comes into the novel much like Mary comes to Bethlehem, on a donkey, humbly dressed, guided by the temperamental Thomas Culpepper. As Joseph played second fiddle to God, Culpepper will have to play second fiddle to King Henry. A timely replacement for the politically desirable but physically repellent Anne of Cleves, Katherine is intelligent, beautiful [...]

    17. Stylistically, this is a luxurious and vividly-written trilogy, flush with grand, insightful oratory and dramatic visual description. It captures the feel and sound of Tudor England impressively well. The dialogue is particularly well-executed. Although it can be a little slow to get into, after you've marinated in the flavor of the first few chapters, it becomes a very immersive world. If you're a real stickler for historically accurate and easy-to-follow character arcs, however, you won't find [...]

    18. “The Fifth Queen: A Novel of the Court of Henry VIII” by Ford Madox FordFirst, let me state that I found Ford’s prose and description of many background events to be beautiful, even melodic at times. In addition, his creativity and ability to “render” a cohesive, elaborate, even elegant story is without question. Therefore, I have given this book 4 stars.However, personally, I have read several books about the Tudor era and the Kings and Queens of England. I found that I enjoy the hist [...]

    19. This is actually three novels written about Kat Howard during 1906 - 1908. It is a very different portrayal of her than the typical one of flighty, shallow, and morally loose. Here she is religiously devout and intelligent, which is as another reviewer pointed out much more accurate of Anne Boylen than Kat Howard. Perhaps less scholarly work had been done on Kat Howard than or perhaps Ford just made up his character to suit his wishes. Either way this book has to be viewed as a work of literatur [...]

    20. I recently read Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies, so when my library displayed a collection of Tudor novels, I snapped this up. I loved reading these books so close together! The hero of Mantel's trilogy is the villain of Ford's, and as another reviewer pointed out, Mantel also uses Ford's impressionist technique.The Fifth Queen follows Kat Howard from her arrival in Henry VIII's court to her downfall and execution. Ford portrays her as a devout, tragic heroine determined to bri [...]

    21. I'm engaged in a bit of a paradox here in that, while I prefer The Fifth Queen to Mantel's Cromwell histori-fiction, I gave Mantel's 3 stars and 5Q only 2. My reasoning is this: while I think 5Q does a lot more and without sounding like a soap opera, Bring Up the Bodies achieves stylistic excellence in drawing an incredibly detailed picture of Cromwell without the reader's realizing that the paintbrush has been picked up (showing rather than telling). Though the narrative is sometimes simple to [...]

    22. This book grew on me. In the beginning the language made it hard to follow, but by the end I was not in doubt about buying the rest of the trilogy. I think what did it, was how human and believable the characters seemed to me, especially the relationship between king Henry and his daughter Mary was painful to read about. It didn't occur to me that even a sovereign king may become a victim of political circumstances. Also, it's interesting that Katharine Howard is described as wise, educated and [...]

    23. This book is Ford Maddox's take on Henry VIII's Fifth Wife Katherine Howard. The beginning of the book did not pull me into the story at all. I was expecting more of an accurate tale of when she was at her Grandmothers house, but it starts with her and her cousin Thomas Culpepper. The inaccuracy of the beginning of this book made me uninterested but once I took it more as a novel and less of an accurate history story I began to enjoy my reading of this book more. I know that Maddox tried to stay [...]

    24. This is the first book in a trilogy focusing on Katharine Howard, Henry VIII's fifth wife. I say more about the whole series in the review of the last part, "The Fifth Queen Crowned."Though written 14 years after Ford's first novel, this reads like someone ponderously learning to write. The dialog ranges from stilted to dreadful, the historical detail alternates between pickily detailed and confusingly abrupt. Where Ford does shine–as he does more consistently in his later works–is in emotio [...]

    25. It's always interesting to read a historical fiction novel that was written in the past. It makes you realize that the time a novel was written in can greatly affect the novel itself. I wouldn't recommend this book to someone who doesn't know the history around Henry VIII and his wives pretty well as the author refers instead of explains a lot of things. Overall, it was an interesting interpretation of Katherine Howard. Most sources see her as an innocent girl who just didn't know better and did [...]

    26. I came to this fresh from Wolf Hall and Bringinging up the Bodies, as well as having read a great deal about the Tudors and reformation, so I was thrown by the distinctly unique characterization Ford gives us of katherine Howard. It seemed a somewhat capricious decision, yoked entirely to his desire to set Cromwell and howard as competing states of England. I loved the writing, the language and perspectives, but the realism of all that was ruined a bit by my inability to believe this was what Ka [...]

    27. This book was an entertaining historical fiction. Much of what Ford created in this book runs against what history tells us. He spends much time trying to vindicate Katherine as a hero for the old religion, but still manages to paint her as altogether too trusting. I liked his perception of Henry's court and the other players in the drama but I just felt his rendering of Katherine too unbelievable - even for fiction.

    28. Historical fiction? More like historical fantasy. Ford renders Katherine Howard a pious, devout Catholic, a polyglot (besides being a Latin scholar she speaks German, French, Italian, and no doubt, Spanish fluently), a rhetorician who could out maneuver Cicero(if only he had been around),whose primary ambition in life is to restore the old faith in England. Though maybe not the best historical resource on the fifth queen the book was imaginative and interesting. I enjoyed it's revisionism.

    29. Perhaps the perfect historical novel. Utterly believable, unlike the tons of Tudor porn we have been subjected to since Ford wrote this. This Kat Howard is very different from the caricatures of popular culture. Ford presents her as educated, articulate, passionately committed to her religious faith, and innocent of the misdeeds attributed to her by her enemies. The 16th century has never been more alive to the reader than in this masterpiece.

    30. I'm fascinated with this period of English history (Henry VIII)and so I was curious about this book about Katherine Howard. But after plodding along through the first 100 pages or so I've decided to abandon it entirely. (life is too short to read books that don't grab me.) The main problem with this one is that unless you're really up to date on the politics of the period it's impossible to keep everything straight.

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