• Title: True Crime
  • Author: Max Allan Collins
  • ISBN: 9780743459006
  • Page: 307
  • Format: Paperback
  • True Crime By the author of The Road To Perdition this title sees Private Eye Nate Heller trying discover who the gunshot victim was found next to the Biograph Theatre the man the FBI confidently identified a
    By the author of The Road To Perdition, this title sees Private Eye Nate Heller trying discover who the gunshot victim was, found next to the Biograph Theatre, the man the FBI confidently identified as John Dillinger His search for the answer leads him into a confrontation with J Edgar Hoover.

    One Reply to “True Crime”

    1. This author can write one hell of a detective novel. I really enjoyed it. I recomend this to all.Enjoy and Be Blessed.Diamond

    2. TRUE CRIME by Max Allen Collins is the follow-up to True Detective, and is the second book in the Nate Heller series. Nate is a former Chicago police officer turned private detective and lives a life rubbing elbows with celebrities on both sides of the law, and once again in this book the lines are blurred between good and bad for both Nate and many of the famous people in the story that makes it easy at times to be sympathetic with law keepers and lawbreakers.I highly recommend this book to any [...]

    3. The Nate Heller novels explore the seedy underworld of organised crime blending fact and fiction to create an irresistible tale that appeals to true crime buffs and noir enthusiasts alike. In TRUE CRIME, author Max Allan Collins pits his former cop turned solo PI against public enemies John Dillinger and the Barker gang among others. I love the way Max Allan Collins subtly introduces Dillinger by way of a man wanting to keep tabs on his promiscuous wife. Dillinger, having undergone plastic surge [...]

    4. As always, Collins packs about three plots-worth of material into his "Nathan Heller" novels. (Sally Rand? Genius.) But boring it ain't. Indeed, I was trying to see how he was going to get out of this book's twists and turns--but they mostly come down to Nathan Heller's screwups.

    5. The second Nathan Heller and I'm really enjoying this stuff! Max Allan Collins blends history and fiction, real personalities and fictional characters and in so doing comes up with a very satisfying blend that informs us of a past time while simoultaneously entertaining us. I'll be reading more of him. I plan to read the entire Nathan Heller series but before I continue with that I think I'll read some non-Nathan Collins.

    6. This is a good writer and this is a good story. The problem for me is, I just have a hard time when a series has a character that happens to be in the middle of every historical event of his day. It just kinda reminds me of watching Mr. Peabody's History on the Rocky and Bullwinkle show when I was growing up. Which was really pretty good, just kinda hard to swallow even for a kid.

    7. 1934 Chicago. Gangsters, molls, corrupt politicians, movie starlets, crooked cops, J. Edgar Hoover, and a 26-year-pld PI named Nate Heller is right in the middle of it all. This is a great read from start to finish. $7.99 on Kindle.

    8. I have read three other Nate Heller books by Max Collins: True Detective, The Chicago Lightning, and Flying Blind. I still like these detective novels, for their setting in the 1930s, for their use of actual events and characters, and for the wit and savvy of the lead character, Nate Heller, a private detective and former Chicago cop. True Crime is set in 1934 and follows the events surrounding the killing of bank robber John Dillinger in front of the Biograph theater in Chicago. The story also [...]

    9. The Crooks, the Cops and the Big RichMAC's second Heller story in the Nitti trilogy is as good as the first, if a shade less good than the final one. Idiotically, I read them 3,1, 2 - not that it made much difference. Ironically, 312 is the core area code for Chicago.In this novel, Heller is a struggling detective who gets wrapped up in the Dillinger case. The noir historical fiction idea of these books was well established in the first novel - it is not a diversion but the idea behind the serie [...]

    10. Have open while you read this bookCollins again does an amazing job of making you unsure of what is fact and fiction. I spent as much time reading about the real people (on the internet) throughout this book as I did the actual book. Collins is brilliant, and I really appreciate the research he put into these novels.

    11. Nathan Heller, ex-cop turned private eye, brings the reader back to 1930’s Chicago, where mob leaders seem to be the true rulers in the city that is hosting the World Fair. Nate is presented with a simple case as a doubting husband asks the detective to keep an eye on his wife, who seems to have other friendly men around when the husband is out of town. But things get complicated quickly as Nate begins to believe to lovely wife might be keeping company with one of the most sought after men in [...]

    12. This gets half a star for detail, and half of another for having pages, but misses out on the stars for character, plot,style and narrative.I couldn't add it to any of my bookshelves as I do not have any labelled "text-book".This is the second Max Allan Collins I have tried and the second time I have been disappointed. The first was a hard case crime piece of pulp that due to its length meant I was able to chew through it and grumble afterwards. This one was just too much of a hard slog. I try t [...]

    13. Nathan Heller, an ex-cop turned P.I is barely making ends meet. It's a sweltering July in Chicago in the early 30's and the World's Fair is once again being hosted by the Windy City. One of the attractions is a burlesque act by the famous Sally Rand, who happens to be one of Nate's few customers. When he wraps up the investigation she hired him for, she is no longer his client snd their relationship moves into a whole new level. Fortunately, Nate soon gets a job from a new prospective client: to [...]

    14. The book was okay in my opinion. I love series like this, Ed McBain's Detective series come to mind. I'm also a huge history buff and love anything mafia/gangster related. So when I saw this book had all 3, I jumped on it. I thought I was going to be sucked in an wouldn't want to put it down. And that unfortunately didn't happen. And I can't really explain why.It might just be that I didn't fall in love with the characters. I found them all to be a little 2D for my taste. Nate never fleshed out [...]

    15. Max Collins has created the coolest private detective ever to have walked the streets of Chicago. I think there are 12-14 books in Collins' Nathan Heller series (all of which stand alone nicely, btw)Collins does an excellent job of weaving his detective into real-life historical settings starting in the 1930s. He's at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, where he meets Sally Rand. He deals with gangsters ranging from Capone to Nitti and is best friends with Elliot Ness. True Crime and True Detective ( [...]

    16. Wow this took me a while to finish but it is because I got sidetracked by another set of fabulous books but more on those in their own reviews. As for True Crime it was every bit as good as the first Nathan Heller book True Detective. In this opus Collins has Heller involved with the alleged shooting of John Dillinger at the Biograph theater in Chicago in 1935. Along the way he has more dealings with Frank Nitti and is involved in a complicated plot to kidnap J. Edgar Hoover by a gang of crimina [...]

    17. Nathan Heller is back. This time a routine case following a wife who may be unfaithful leads him into the Dillinger shooting. All the players from the period are here: Purvis, Dillinger, Nitti, as well as Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Alan Karpis, and the Barker gang. Lots of fun and some beautiful molls along the way.It's often hard to give reviews dealing with crime and mystery stories without giving too much away. Let's just say that there are a lot of surprises along the way for Mr. He [...]

    18. It's 1934, Sally Rand is still dancing with bubbles at the Century of Progress and Nate Heller is looking for clients. Nate and Sally go from being friends to lovers, Nate gets mixed up in a situation that leads to the Dillinger killing (or was it?) and then in another situation that gets him involved with Ma Barker and her gang and an abortive J. Edgar Hoover kidnapping.The Chicago stuff is still fun and well done, and it reads well for the first 300 pages, but I would have liked this book bett [...]

    19. Another great entry in the Nate Heller series from Collins. This is the second Heller in the series after "True Detective" which I thought was also a super historical crime novel. In "True Crime", Heller gets involved with a setup to assassinate John Dillinger on the streets of Chicago in 1934. But was it really Dillinger who was killed? Heller doesn't think so. He then gets involved with Ma Barker and her boys, Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson and other "public enemies" in a plot to kidnap J. [...]

    20. I enjoyed Nathan Heller as PI hero in the first book True Detective but his voice didnt grow out of the PI stereotype before this book to me. Its a near perfect blend of story,character when it comes to hardboiled detective stories, an improvement on the first book. Another thing that stands out to me about this series is that its also about real world history. Collins blends the fiction so well with the history, documentary part about 1930s US,Chicago,historical people. The immense historical r [...]

    21. Two related novellas with Heller hired as part of the plan to help John Dillinger fake his death and then while on another case he runs into a gang bent on a kidnapping caper while trying to find a missing person. Lots of historical background and in the first tale more of the real life data that tries to show how Dillinger faked his demise. This series blends our fictional detective into the real events of the Chicago Outfit under Nitti and the spread of their influence west and through the yea [...]

    22. Just finished this. I read the first book of the "Nathan Heller" series and I liked it but didn't think I would read any more but something drew me to this book and I'm glad it did. The "Nathan Heller" series are historical novels set in the 1930's. This one includes John Dillinger, Ma Barker, Pretty Boy Floyd, J Edgar Hoover to name a few. It was a very good story (actually two, that are connected.) I highly recommend this novel but you should read the first one (True Detective) to get the back [...]

    23. This book is exactly what I expected it to be: entertaining and smart. Collins can sometimes give the impression that he's not a clever writer but then you get to the end and you realize you were taken for a ride and Nathan Heller was sitting right there beside you. In True Crime, you get the added bonus that these events actually happened (more or less, of course) and it ties into the glamorous and popular crime culture of the 1930's. If you want to have a good time without feeling like you sho [...]

    24. I liked this one even more than the first installment, True Detective. Boy, that Nathan Heller really gets around! It's the summer of 1934, and public enemies like Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson are running amok. The basic premise of these stories is to insert a fictional protagonist amongst a cast of real-life characters, and retell history from a new point of view. Sure, it's far-fetched, but it's also well researched and written. It's hard not to like these novels, even if you cringe at the t [...]

    25. It takes a certain amount of conceit to write a historical novel that not only includes historical figures, but also incorporates historical events. Max Allan Collins is guilty of this conceit, but succeeds admirably. In the second Nathan Heller novel the hero takes on John Dillinger and Ma Barker, among many others. Collins includes an afterword where he separates fact from fiction, enhancing the book still further. Recommended!

    26. I liked the first of the two stories in this book. I was not so thrilled with the second one. The protagonist sort of went off the rails and entered the life that he was so against in the first story a little too far for my taste. He came around in the end, only to find that he was a dope in the end. I am not sure saving the life of J. Edgar Hoover was a good thing, so I guess it was a good thing it wasn't really "true" crime.

    27. Fun fiction surrounding Chicago during the good ol' days just after Prohibition. Mostly about the pursuit of Dillinger and the public's fascination with him, it was especially fun to read if you're from Chicago and know all the locations referenced in it. Collins has a way with dialog that's not as hard-boiled as a Dashiell Hammett or a Raymond Chandler, but his hero Nathan Heller is a funny, likeable guy. Favorite quote: "Mind if I smoke? Heller's response: "I don't care if you burn."

    28. After enjoying True Detective, this one was no disappointment. Again in Chicago in the 1930s. It features John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Doc Barker, Baby Face Nelson, and J. Edgar Hoover. The writing may not be as good as Raymond Chandler, but the story is better. A good combination of historical fiction and noir.

    29. Entertaining and interesting. It focuses on 1934-35 in Chicago and captures well the depths of the economic depression and the crime of that era ranging from the remains of the Capone mob to the activities of the Barker Gang and John Dillinger.To me, this was really two novellas, stitched together. The needlework was, at times, awkward. Sally Rand, of the famous fan dance, and Barney Ross, the boxer, are important characters and this worked pretty well.

    30. Very good follow-up to "True Detective". I did enjoy True Detective better but that's certainly a hard act to follow. I'm loving these books. Collins is an excellent writer and does an amazing job placing fictional private eye Nate Heller in a world of historical figures and events. On to the next one, Million Dollar Wound

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