• Title: Wolves at the Door: The Trials of Fatty Arbuckle
  • Author: David Kizer
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 148
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Wolves at the Door The Trials of Fatty Arbuckle Wolves at the Door is the compelling true story of actor Roscoe Fatty Arbuckle manslaughter trials of It is the narrative day by day account of the still unsolved mystery surrounding the sud
    Wolves at the Door is the compelling true story of actor Roscoe Fatty Arbuckle manslaughter trials of 1921 1922 It is the narrative day by day account of the still unsolved mystery surrounding the sudden death of Virginia Rappe, four days after a drinking party in Arbuckle s rooms at the St Francis Hotel at the height of prohibition As seen from the perspective of A Wolves at the Door is the compelling true story of actor Roscoe Fatty Arbuckle manslaughter trials of 1921 1922 It is the narrative day by day account of the still unsolved mystery surrounding the sudden death of Virginia Rappe, four days after a drinking party in Arbuckle s rooms at the St Francis Hotel at the height of prohibition As seen from the perspective of Arbuckle, the judges and the attorneys, Wolves at the Door combines the public s adulation with the early stars of Hollywood and the drama of courtroom confrontations and the looming presence of William Randolph Hearst.The science of CSI was introduced to America during the trials for the sole purpose of convicting Arbuckle Some of the witnesses were coerced and others simply lied The mystery of Rappe s death became the national fixation as perhaps the funniest man in the world went on trial for his life for a crime that the evidence showed he could not have committed.

    One Reply to “Wolves at the Door: The Trials of Fatty Arbuckle”

    1. Read for book club.Self-published work that would benefit from an editor, as well as the addition of an index, and list of sources. During a party in Roscoe Arbuckle's San Francisco hotel rooms, a sometime actress dies -- accident? manslaughter? murder? Here is an exacting description of silent film comedian Roscoe Arbuckle's three trials before his eventual, and justified, acquittal at the third trial.

    2. Best written, most thoroughly researched book on the Arbuckle trials. Takes the reader right to 1921. I felt like I was watching while the whole debacle was happening!

    3. This is a self-published book about the murder charges leveled against silent film star Fatty Arbuckle in 1921, and I'd like to cut the author, David Kizer, some slack. I admire that he took on such an ambitious project and saw it through. Some have said here that the book is poorly written (and it is) but I think the bigger fault is that it's poorly edited. Some of the editing problems may seem trivial, although reading this book makes it apparent that commas in the wrong place, as well as the [...]

    4. Frankly, I can't believe I almost read 200 pages of this before throwing in the towel. As it turns out, the most truthful and relevant statement may be at the very beginning of the book, where somebody disclaims that "Most of the following is probably true."I was looking for a fact-based historical biography, which some reviews purport this to be, but it is really anything but. There are no footnotes, no bibliography, no identified sources, which makes it perfectly impossible to distinguish betw [...]

    5. This is probably 3 1/2★.I thought the story was pretty interesting, taking a lot of the book straight from the testiminy in the multiple trials in 1923. Hard to believe that many trials could be done in 7 months. No way that would happen today. However, it seemed to drag along, a trifle repetitious and needed an editor. If an author is taliing about the Fates, why not call them the Fates instead of Moirae? I had to look it up.

    6. Good subject matter, but I found the book not to be very well written. The author waxed too indignant on Arbuckle's behalf. The book contained some rather surprising spelling mistakes (of the kind that a spell-checker can't catch. For example, 'confidant' instead of confident, and having a priest administering the 'last rights'.

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