• Title: The Homiletical Plot: The Sermon as Narrative Art Form
  • Author: Eugene L. Lowry
  • ISBN: 9780664222642
  • Page: 188
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Homiletical Plot The Sermon as Narrative Art Form Now in reissue with a new foreword by Fred B Craddock and afterword by the author Eugene L Lowry The Homiletical Plot Expanded Edition follows in the same solid tradition of its predecessor Upon it
    Now in reissue with a new foreword by Fred B Craddock and afterword by the author, Eugene L Lowry, The Homiletical Plot, Expanded Edition follows in the same solid tradition of its predecessor Upon its release, The Homiletical Plot quickly became a pivotal work on the art of preaching Instead of comments on a biblical passage, Lowry suggested that the sermon follow a nNow in reissue with a new foreword by Fred B Craddock and afterword by the author, Eugene L Lowry, The Homiletical Plot, Expanded Edition follows in the same solid tradition of its predecessor Upon its release, The Homiletical Plot quickly became a pivotal work on the art of preaching Instead of comments on a biblical passage, Lowry suggested that the sermon follow a narrative form that moves from beginning to end, as with the plot of a story This expanded edition continues to be an excellent teaching resource and learning tool for all preachers from introductory students to seasoned clergy.

    One Reply to “The Homiletical Plot: The Sermon as Narrative Art Form”

    1. WOW. Ok so how? how do I pull this off. Call me lazy or unimaginative, but I would have adored about 17 more examples for each sermonic stage. Or if the scattered examples were pulled together into one sermon in an appendix? Still, this is excellent. 👌🏼

    2. One of the ministers where I go to church gave me this book as a read on the art of preparing sermons. It discussed the fact that the three point sermon with the tell them what you're going to tell them, tell them, tell them what you told them wasn't what people needed to hear. It discussed a narrative form that took 5 steps:- Upsetting the equilibrium- Analyzing the discrepancy- Disclosing the clue to resolution- Experiencing the gospel- Anticipating the consequencesThere were quite a few examp [...]

    3. Eugene Lowry’s work sits under the broad umbrella of the New Homiletic. His work overlaps considerably with Fred Craddock. Other New Homiletic writers have been criticized for writing well, but failing to provide a clear model of what they are suggesting. This charge cannot be leveled at Lowry. The Homiletic Plot was first released in 1980, then re-released twenty-one years later. The text of the book remains unchanged, with the only significant change being an additional afterword. This addit [...]

    4. I'm not sure how I made it out of seminary without reading this text, but it has unmade my entire sermon writing process. Which is a good thing.The opening chapter and the closing 2 should be printed out and given to every preacher in America.

    5. Originally published 1980, this is deservedly one of the most influential books on homiletics in the last half century. The art of good preaching has moved so much in the last thirty years in the direction proposed here, that it is difficult to reimagine what a breath of fresh air it was when it first appeared. An expanded edition appeared in 2001, leaving the original text unchanged, but supplementing it with an afterword.Lowry’s was an early salvo in a new approach to homiletics, impatient w [...]

    6. Eugene Lowry'sThe Homiletical Plot was written for preachers, but don't let that scare you. Around its occasional theological terms and references is a short, accessible book on how to take a speech from an informative presentation to a suspenseful, dramatic event.How does Lowry promise to do this? By making presentations narrative. Not just filled with narratives, but structurally narrative. For Lowry, this happens in five parts: the speaker 1) 'Upsets the equilibrium' with a compelling problem [...]

    7. Lowry suggests taking a narrative approach to preaching, as opposed to the inductive approach of liberal preaching (connecting to human experiences and drawing together larger themes) and the deductive approach of Barthian preaching (asserting the gospel over/against human experience and deducing specific applications). The narrative approach involves five movements 1) upsetting the equilibrium 2) analyzing/complicating the discrepancy 3) hinting at clue toward resolution 4) experiencing the gos [...]

    8. Lowry believes that the element missing from preaching literature is tension. Building and releasing tension through the 5 steps will allow for more powerful sermons that speak to the emotion as well as the intellect.It is a great eye-opener for anyone who has or is about to work with the narrative elements of the Bible.

    9. Really loved this one. Very clear, and yet with good depth. The sermon is truly a narrative event, not simply an act of "problem-solving." This is one of the best preaching books I have read, and it will be especially helpful for those who have some experience behind the pulpit. Go get it and enjoy!

    10. Lowry has outlined an interesting sermon format that may replace the three-point sermon in certain circles.I disagree with him that his sermon form is the ultimate sermon form, however, it is great for a preacher to have a variety of tools in his tool belt and narrative preaching certainly seems like a powerful one.

    11. This book was one of the primary texts for a course I took on Narrative Preaching. I really enjoyed this work and considered it the best of the books assigned on the topic. Lowry writes with a very approachable manner and after even this short read one can see how to apply his ideas.

    12. Anyone who preaches God's Word regularly would probably benefit from reading this book if for no other reason than to stretch the preacher in his thinking about the construction of the sermon and those who listen to him preach.

    13. Good core points, but could be condensed into a chart or booklet. Drowned in a sea of illustrations that only vaguely illustrated the desired outcome. A summary of each "stage" at the end of each chapter would be valuable.

    14. Great book! Practical advice on developing -- NOT assembling -- sermons. Helpful tips to stimulate narrative preaching.

    15. I have a feeling that as long as I have the occasion to preach, I will keep referring back to this book. Very accessible and practical ideas for the preparation, writing, and proclaiming of sermons.

    16. I am not sure where I stand with this book. There were many things I appreciated, but really chaffed under. the structure.

    17. A good book that promotes one method of preaching. It is worth the read and a good method of preaching to have in your "homiletical golf bag," but limited in scope and limited in usefulness.

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