• Title: Sixty Odd
  • Author: Ursula K. Le Guin
  • ISBN: 9781570623882
  • Page: 234
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sixty Odd Here is the first new book of poems in than a decade from the author so well known for her thought provoking science fiction novels It is also the most autobiographical of Ursula K Le Guin s five poet
    Here is the first new book of poems in than a decade from the author so well known for her thought provoking science fiction novels It is also the most autobiographical of Ursula K Le Guin s five poetry collections, taking its inspiration from the wisdom and perspective that a woman attains in her sixties Here she is at turns wry, playful, and sharply critical Here is the first new book of poems in than a decade from the author so well known for her thought provoking science fiction novels It is also the most autobiographical of Ursula K Le Guin s five poetry collections, taking its inspiration from the wisdom and perspective that a woman attains in her sixties Here she is at turns wry, playful, and sharply critical, with finely observed details of her day to day life and moving philosophical reflections on growing older.

    One Reply to “Sixty Odd”

    1. I read this book at the perfect time, and with excellent accompaniment. I had just finished my favourite (with The Dispossessed) of Le Guin's novels, Tehanu. My mind was primed to hear her voice. I was reading a book of short stories along with this book of poetry. Clarice Lispector is another strong, female writer. Her book was a collection of vignettes about childhood, this one a collection of poetry concerning old age. Finally, I also read a terrible adaptation of ancient Taoist texts arbitra [...]

    2. This collection is great, even if you only read Lost Arrows and the Feather People, which, I think, is better than the rest combined.This is my third Le Guin poetry collection and I really think she's one of my favorite poets, as well as one of my favorite prose writers, which puts her in a unique camp shared by no one. Few of my favorite short story writers are my favorite poets or novelists and so on. I've yet to read many Le Guin short stories, but I plan on reading a few collections next yea [...]

    3. The more I read of this book, the more I enjoyed it. It is a book that is more of meditations and reflections than poetry because, although much of it is interesting, so little of it is 'word-for-word memorable' - my preferred definition of poetry. I found the first half of the book relatively uninteresting in both subject matter and expression, although it has some striking simple verse hidden in it. Here is "In Berkeley":"This is the city of my birth.This is my own uneasy earth.Following Time' [...]

    4. I love Le Guin's prose so much. I didn't like her poetry quite as much, probably because I prefer to read her in chunks a bit bigger than bitesize, but her imagery and use of words is lovely no matter what. Some of the poems really got to me, too: a couple of them made me want to cry.

    5. LeGuin's poems are big, even when they are short. Each is a short story, or maybe even a novella - the kind of poem you read and then sit around for a while trying to finish the story.

    6. Poems, she means. But I think the title is a play on age too. Some good ones, some of which will be appearing soon on my poetry post.

    7. A few of my favorites from this collection: "For Gabriela Mistral," "Hexagram 49," "A Traveler at a Lake in New England," "Entanglements," "Repulse Monkey," and "College."

    8. Gorgeous, spare, searing poems of memory, loss, and perfect moments. You might have to be in your sixties to really appreciate these poems, but they spoke to me deeply.

    9. Most of the book is a 3, but the poems about family and friendships in the last part of the book push it to a 4.

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