• Title: Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor: The Forging of American Independence, 1774-1776
  • Author: Richard Beeman
  • ISBN: 9780465026296
  • Page: 239
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Our Lives Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor The Forging of American Independence In Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush stood before the empty throne of King George III overcome with emotion as he gazed at the symbol of America s connection with England Eight years later
    In 1768, Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush stood before the empty throne of King George III, overcome with emotion as he gazed at the symbol of America s connection with England Eight years later, he became one of the fifty six men to sign the Declaration of Independence, severing America forever from its mother country Rush was not alone in his radical decision manyIn 1768, Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush stood before the empty throne of King George III, overcome with emotion as he gazed at the symbol of America s connection with England Eight years later, he became one of the fifty six men to sign the Declaration of Independence, severing America forever from its mother country Rush was not alone in his radical decision many of those casting their votes in favor of independence did so with a combination of fear, reluctance, and even sadness In Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor, acclaimed historian Richard R Beeman examines the grueling twenty two month period between the meeting of the Continental Congress on September 5, 1774 and the audacious decision for independence in July of 1776 As late as 1774, American independence was hardly inevitable indeed, most Americans found it neither desirable nor likely When delegates from the thirteen colonies gathered in September, they were, in the words of John Adams, a gathering of strangers Yet over the next two years, military, political, and diplomatic events catalyzed a change of unprecedented magnitude the colonists rejection of their British identities in favor of American ones In arresting detail, Beeman brings to life a cast of characters, including the relentless and passionate John Adams, Adams much misunderstood foil John Dickinson, the fiery political activist Samuel Adams, and the relative political neophyte Thomas Jefferson, and with profound insight reveals their path from subjects of England to citizens of a new nation A vibrant narrative, Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor tells the remarkable story of how the delegates to the Continental Congress, through courage and compromise, came to dedicate themselves to the forging of American independence.

    One Reply to “Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor: The Forging of American Independence, 1774-1776”

    1. Author Richard Beeman leaves no stone unturned as he thoroughly and exhaustively examines the crucial years of 1774-1776, and the build-up years that played such an instrumental role in setting the stage for colonial dissension, ultimately leading up to declaring independence outright. The narrative, with its impressive dramatis personae, shines a bright light on the situations, circumstances, and events slowly unfolding into that national holiday we all know and celebrate today as July 4th.Whil [...]

    2. Of the collection of books that have come out in the last few years on this period of American/U.S. history and its role in the framing of the U.S. Constitution, this one is one of the better ones. I gave it only four stars because I think the author omits some important information about (a) the history of the British Constitution, particularly the consequences of the Glorious Revolution and the 1689 Bill of Rights in definitely rejecting Puritanism (most evident in John and Sam Adams' views) a [...]

    3. This is a comprehensive and generally engaging narrative of the First and Second Continental Congresses through the adoption of the Declaration of Indepence. Beeman introduces the many characters involved in that process. He expresses some prejudices concerning some of those people, but not so as to interfere with the story. This is a good book for anyone who wants to get a personal look at the people and events of this foundational moment in the history of America.

    4. this was one of the most stressful experiences of my life. this book contains way too much detail. like, there's so much detail. its uncomfortable. theres at least a paragraph about sam adam's butt

    5. For me, Beeman is the most readable historian going. I enjoy his style, which combines straight-forward reporting of events with an easy-to-follow chronology that makes the big picture come into view. He does his best to avoid judgments, giving nice detail on the individuals involved. This book drills down into the last spasms of the colonies as they came to realize there was no reasonable alternative to declaring independence. This is by no means a glorification of the U.S but a real effort to [...]

    6. A book that holds your interest as you proceed almost day by day through the years leading up to 1776, experiencing the small steps forward, and many steps back, of the journey to independence. Has given me a much richer understanding of the role of John Dickenson of Pennsylvania in finally getting to consensus. My previous impression was mainly colored by the PBS special on John Adams. Now I feel I have a more rounded idea of the conflicting players and factions that had to converge to agree on [...]

    7. Very cool book. This is the first book I've read that looks at the Continental Congress from the inside as it evolved from a group of representatives of individual colonies to the defacto government of 13 united States. I've read a lot about the revolutionary war, but this is the first book I've read that examines how we became a nation based on representative government and shared values.

    8. Here's my review of Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor, at Books and Culture booksandculture/articl

    9. Excellent look at the lead up to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Definitely a must read for anyone who enjoys American History, especially colonial history leading up to the Revolutionary War.

    10. Beeman has wonderful command of language and writes with clarity. However, at more than 600 pages, too much unnecessary, in my opinion, detail which made reading tedious, slow.Were it not for extraneous detail, my opinion, the book would have received five stars.Jim

    11. This is a very interesting account of the steps toward revolution from 17774 through July 4 of 1776.

    12. Excellent accounting of the the Continental Congress up to the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

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