• Title: Present Concerns
  • Author: C.S. Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780156738408
  • Page: 130
  • Format: Paperback
  • Present Concerns Nineteen essays on democratic values threats to educational and spiritual fulfillment literary censorship and other topics all displaying Lewis s characteristic sanity and persuasiveness Introducti
    Nineteen essays on democratic values, threats to educational and spiritual fulfillment, literary censorship, and other topics all displaying Lewis s characteristic sanity and persuasiveness Introduction by Walter Hooper.

    One Reply to “Present Concerns”

    1. Good collection of essays published in a variety of journals and newspapers between 1940 and 1962. Interesting to read Lewis being topical, especially in the first several essays, which were written in the shifting context of World War II. The wartime essays caution especially against the dangers of democracy and envy, and against the potential of wartime powers being continued and abused after the crisis had passed. Notable among them is “On Living in an Atomic Age,” in which Lewis consider [...]

    2. A potential reader might legitimately ask how "present" concerns expressed by C. S. Lewis fifty to sixty years ago might be. These concerned are quite current. In fact, twenty-first century readers might be surprised at the relevancy of Lewis's thoughts on literaure, education, and censorship.Three essays--"Equality, "Talking about Bicycles" and "Living in the Atomic Age"--are worth the price of the book alone. (Spoiler warning: the latter are not about what their title suggests.)A slim volume b [...]

    3. This collection includes nineteen essays C.S. Lewis wrote for various occasions between 1940 and 1962. While a few of the references now seem rather obscure, there are many outstanding pieces here. I will mention just a couple that stand out.The whole reason I opened this book, which had been sitting on our shelves so long, is that I'm interested in the topic of enchantment. Online searches led me to the essay "Talking About Bicycles," and I was intrigued by Lewis's discussion there. This essay, [...]

    4. Quite good and eye-opening in bits. Probably Lewis at his most political. His chapter on Chivalry is quite instructive and more than ever here he discusses the dangers of egalitarianism. Given all the discussions of envy lately, it seems the picture is a wee bit more complicated. It's not just envy, although envy is definitely one of the motives behind modern egalitarianism. It is a poisonousideathat allows or excuses envy. The solution methinks is not so much to issue more exhortations as to re [...]

    5. Being a collection of his journalism.Journalism that would have been ephemera except for the fame of the byline is always an interesting excursion into the time of its writing. I recommend it in general for anyone looking for primary source, whether for a given era or for learning about different societies in general.This particular one hits on all sorts of topics. The Home Guard during World War II -- not favorably --and the attitude of soldiers, which appears to have been rather cynical. Schoo [...]

    6. These short essays by C. S. Lewis were mostly for newspapers and periodicals. For good reason they are not among his best known works. Some have interesting points, but they are often dated (as one would expect in newspaper writing), and some even tend to ramble a bit.

    7. A collection of Lewis's writings on political, educational, cultural, and ethical issues. Most of them are only 4-6 pages, with all 19 essays coming in at 108 pages. Excellent, excellent, excellent.

    8. The title of this collection of journalistic essays is only partially tongue-in-cheek; Lewis' writings from the middle of the 20th century are relevant today, primarily because Lewis always had his eye on the eternal aspects of contemporary issues. Collections of essays are hard to review, and as these particular works were intended for various publications of the day their scope is wider than most, but they're worth reading if only because Lewis is an undersung master of the format, delivering [...]

    9. Even though some of the issues are dated, Lewis' advice is still valid and good for the issues that are currently with us.

    10. This is C.S. Lewis writing for a narrower and more parochial audience. I can't recall exactly why I added this to my to-read list, but it was worth the time spent for this passage from the essay “On Living in an Atomic Age”: “If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things - praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game o [...]

    11. Poignant and pointed as usual, Lewis is one of those thinkers who you can learn from on any topic. Present Concerns is a series of articles and transcriptions that cover a wide array of different subjects including education, war, and literature. I think the value of this work is that it is a very wise and articulate man saying meaningful things about important subjects. That is to say, it provides a respected voice that helps one move the ball down the field in their own thinking. It is short b [...]

    12. My copy of present concerns is the most-dog eared among the CSLewis essay collections bought new from the bookstore. There's something fascinating about Lewis writing about matters of a journalistic rather than mythic scale. He brings his characteristic logic and charming writing style to bear on such matters as 'sex in literature', 'living in the atomic age', 'equality', and 'democratic education'. A fascinating read for those like me who come from a journalistic background de Leon12:36 PM Janu [...]

    13. Lewis is lucid and entertaining no matter what he writes about. This is a collection of the articles he wrote for newspapers and magazines on non-literary topics. Most of the stuff in here (the function of school, what it means to be a democratic society, what it means to be civilized whatsoever) one can find elsewhere in his work, but it might clarify one's own thought to see it crystallized like this, divorced from the course of a larger work. Enjoyable and a quick read.

    14. I only recently heard about this volume of Lewis essays when my pastor alluded to it on a Sunday morning. It's a collection of journalistic articles and essays that C.S. Lewis wrote for newspapers and magazines. They're shorter pieces than those in _God in the Dock_, and they tend to deal more with the politics and events of his day. But a few of them sparkle and shine with some magnificent and memorable quotes. Recommended if you're looking for more Lewis to savor and enjoy.

    15. Present Concerns consists of 19 short essays or editorials by CS Lewis, ranging in topic from chivalry, to sex in literature, to the war, to what it means to be living in an atomic age. I enjoyed every article, regardless of whether I agreed with his point or not. He has a knack for creating comparisons and analogies that are clear, logical and stick in your mind. I only wish I had read a couple of these when I was writing about chivalry in university!

    16. I wasn't aware of this collection of C. S. Lewis's work until a month ago. This book features much shorter pieces (3-4 pages) rather than the 15-20 page essays found in "The World's Last Night" or "The Weight of Glory>" For this reason, I think the book would be good for newer Lewis readers who haven't built up the concentration needed to track with his lengthier pieces.A couple of the essays are 4 and 5-star and some are 2-star. I averaged it out to 3-star.

    17. A collection of essays by C.S. Lewis. On Living in the Atomic Age is one essay within the book that is a must read."Those who care for something else more than civilization are the only people by whom civilization is at all likely to be preserved. Those who want Heaven most have served Earth best."

    18. A collection of essays written during the WWII years concerning the cultural shifts in Britain. These concerns are as important to question today, as they where then. A worthwhile read, very thoughtful, interesting and timeless.

    19. Four and a half stars! Some of these essays are a bit dated. This book would have benefited from little introductions to the context or reason for Lewis to write it. Maybe subsequent editions have this, but in spite of this these essays, the parts my feeble mind can comprehend, are amazing!

    20. Short essays, easy to ingest but harder to digest. It's amazing how much skill he has and how much opinion he can present in 1200 words. Loved it!

    21. A collection of newspaper (or newspaper-like) articles from Lewis. Nothing groundbreaking here, but a nice little potpourri of ideas from a great thinker.

    22. This short collection of essays are, undoubtedly, some of the most important articles Lewis ever wrote. I will return to this again and again.

    23. Lewis at his usual best. My personal favorites were "Modern Man and his Categories of Thought," "Private Bates," and "The Necessity of Chivalry."

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