• Title: Turning the Black Sox White: The Misunderstood Legacy of Charles A. Comiskey
  • Author: Tim Hornbaker Bob Hoie
  • ISBN: 9781613216385
  • Page: 128
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Turning the Black Sox White The Misunderstood Legacy of Charles A Comiskey Charles Albert The Old Roman Comiskey was a larger than life figure a man who had precision in his speech and who could work a room with handshakes and smiles While he has been vilified in film as a r
    Charles Albert The Old Roman Comiskey was a larger than life figure a man who had precision in his speech and who could work a room with handshakes and smiles While he has been vilified in film as a rotund cheapskate and the driving force, albeit unknowingly, behind the actions of the 1919 White Sox, who threw the World Series nicknamed the Black Sox scandal , that sCharles Albert The Old Roman Comiskey was a larger than life figure a man who had precision in his speech and who could work a room with handshakes and smiles While he has been vilified in film as a rotund cheapskate and the driving force, albeit unknowingly, behind the actions of the 1919 White Sox, who threw the World Series nicknamed the Black Sox scandal , that statement is far from the truth.In his five decades involved in baseball, Comiskey loved the sport through and through It was his passion, his life blood, and once he was able to combine his love for the game with his managerial skills, it was the complete package for him There was no other alternative He brought the White Sox to Chicago in 1900 and was a major influential force in running the American League from its inception.From changing the way the first base position was played, to spreading the concept of small ball as a manager, to incorporating the community in his team s persona while he was an owner, Comiskey s style and knowledge improved the overall standard for how baseball should be played.Through rigorous research from the National Archives, newspapers, and various other publications, Tim Hornbaker not only tells the full story of Comiskey s incredible life and the sport at the time, but also debunks the Black Sox controversy, showing that Comiskey was not the reason that the Sox threw the 1919 World Series.Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Sports Publishing imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in sports books about baseball, pro football, college football, pro and college basketball, hockey, or soccer, we have a book about your sport or your team.Whether you are a New York Yankees fan or hail from Red Sox nation whether you are a die hard Green Bay Packers or Dallas Cowboys fan whether you root for the Kentucky Wildcats, Louisville Cardinals, UCLA Bruins, or Kansas Jayhawks whether you route for the Boston Bruins, Toronto Maple Leafs, Montreal Canadiens, or Los Angeles Kings we have a book for you While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to publishing books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked by other publishers and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

    One Reply to “Turning the Black Sox White: The Misunderstood Legacy of Charles A. Comiskey”

    1. If you're thinking about reading this book solely based on the title, you should just read the forward. Within three pages, Bob Hoie blows the whole story of the 1919 Chicago White Sox to hell and proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that Charles Comiskey wasn't quite the miserly figure he seems to be in Eight Men Out.The rest is a straightforward biography, and to be honest, there isn't much to it. The writing is very similar to that in Warren Brown's The Chicago White Sox, and the subject matter [...]

    2. Surprise, surprise- the press at the time of the actual Black Sox Scandal and the decade afterwards took the easy way out and put the biggest blame on the owner. That nasty rich guy! This is a difficult read in minutia of exact historical record style of Charles A. Comiskey's life. If you are interested in baseball, entrepreneur progression from lower class origins to professional sport's team ownership- you may want to tackle it. Lots and lots and lots of classic type baseball stories and playe [...]

    3. Note: I received this book free to read and review.I am a diehard baseball fan and when contacted by the author to preview "Turning the Black Sox White: The Misunderstood Legacy of Charles A. Comiskey", I leapt at the chance. I mean what baseball fan hasn't heard all about the EVIL Charley Comiskey and his money-grubbing ways which drove some of his poor White Sox players into accepting money from gamblers to throw the 1919 World Series. Between Eliot Asinof's book (Eight Men Out: The Black Sox [...]

    4. You may have heard of Charles Comiskey and may think, as did the Sox fan I met on a Door County, Wisconsin beach, that he was not a very nice guy. For a different perspective read “Turning The Black Sox White” is a biography of Charles Comiskey, founding owner of the Chicago White Sox and a prime mover in the early days of the American League. This is an excellent study of a life in baseball including Comiskey’s time with the St. Louis Browns, now the Cardinals, where owner Chris Von der A [...]

    5. The title "Turning the Black Sox White" is a bit misleading because it might lead one to think that author Tim Hornbaker is trying to clean up the image of the infamous 1919 White Sox. That, though, isn't the case at all. Hornbaker has no doubt about the guilt of the players accused of throwing the 1919 World Series. In fact, the Black Sox scandal doesn't even come up until late in the book. Instead, Hornbaker presents one of the more well-rounded views of Chicago White Sox founder Charles Comis [...]

    6. Pretty good book, but a lot more fluff than I expected. The title would apply to the last 3 or 4 chapters. The book is more a biography about Comiskey. Very interesting stuff, but I was expecting to learn more about the ins and outs of the scandal as much as is known or even supposed I guess. There are great gems of information from a baseball history perspective hidden in many of the chapters. For example, I did not know that Cellular Field was the rebuilt Comiskey park renamed. I also did not [...]

    7. This book offers a fantastic, thoroughly researched account of Charles Comiskey's life, and it delivers in disproving the myth that he was a miserly tightwad.My favorite aspect was the great background on Comiskey which is so effective in getting to understand the man. Much evidence is presented in regard to the salaries paid to the players and the fair treatment by Comiskey.I recommend this to all fans of baseball history, especially White Sox fans.

    8. This was a very good book. I had a view of Mr. Comiskey that was based off of Eight Men Out. This book really tells the true story of the White Sox and I really felt bad for Mr. Comiskey after the ball players sold out in 1919. Mr. Comiskey was a true visionary for baseball and he was instrumental in the sport becoming what it is today.

    9. As a lifelong Sox fan, I enjoyed this book but it's not for a casual fan. The books is filled with facts and footnotes and is by no means a quick read. If you like history and baseball, give it a read.

    10. I like the White Sox so this was great to know some of the history but it was so sequential and mundane details about this player signed that player signed. It was far to factual and didn't blend in a story.

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