• Title: The Huguenots
  • Author: Geoffrey Treasure
  • ISBN: 9780300196191
  • Page: 166
  • Format: ebook
  • The Huguenots Following the Reformation a growing number of radical Protestants came together to live and worship in Catholic France These Huguenots survived persecution and armed conflict to win however briefly f
    Following the Reformation, a growing number of radical Protestants came together to live and worship in Catholic France These Huguenots survived persecution and armed conflict to win however briefly freedom of worship, civil rights, and unique status as a protected minority But in 1685, the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes abolished all Huguenot rights, and thanFollowing the Reformation, a growing number of radical Protestants came together to live and worship in Catholic France These Huguenots survived persecution and armed conflict to win however briefly freedom of worship, civil rights, and unique status as a protected minority But in 1685, the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes abolished all Huguenot rights, and than 200,000 of the radical Calvinists were forced to flee across Europe, some even farther In this capstone work, Geoffrey Treasure tells the full story of the Huguenots rise, survival, and fall in France over the course of a century and a half He explores what it was like to be a Huguenot living in a state within a state, weaving stories of ordinary citizens together with those of statesmen, feudal magnates, leaders of the Catholic revival, Henry of Navarre, Catherine de Medici, Louis XIV, and many others Treasure describes the Huguenots disciplined community, their faith and courage, their rich achievements, and their unique place within Protestantism and European history The Huguenot exodus represented a crucial turning point in European history, Treasure contends, and he addresses the significance of the Huguenot story the story of a minority group with the power to resist and endure in one of early modern Europe s strongest nations.

    One Reply to “The Huguenots”

    1. This book is excellent. Obviously any book that covers 250 years must do so as an overview. However, I thought Geoffrey Treasure showed great care and understanding in his handling of the religious matters that plagued France for so long.

    2. The story of the Huguenots is fascinating and complex, and Geoffrey Treasure seems to know every detail, going back even to before they existed. That, however, is part of the problem. He relies a lot on the reader's prior knowledge and also ability to remember a name mentioned fleetingly twenty pages beforehand; his narrative refers forward to things he hasn't explained yet; different names are used for the same person; it is all a bit bogged down in detail. Coming from a Scottish Calvinist back [...]

    3. well researched, decently written, essentially not that riveting by my lights. It gives you a pretty good overview of the history of French Calvinism, from the man himself to the edict of Revocation. If this is a really specific interest of yours than have at it but in retrospect I'm not exactly sure why I decided to pick it up. I do like the Wars of Religion as a time period, I mean, not like it like I want to be in the wake of an invading Swedish army but like it like it's fun to read things a [...]

    4. Written in the style of a smarmy, lugubrious schoolmaster. Fascinating material, but the author assumes the reader has an English public school education and is fluent in French and Latin. Like the other reviewer suggests, there is too much detail and it is easy to become bogged down. I couldn't finish the last 40 pages.

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