• Title: Plague of Demons
  • Author: Keith Laumer
  • ISBN: 9780671559823
  • Page: 277
  • Format: Paperback
  • Plague of Demons Cover Artist Alan AldridgeWhen John Bravais was sent on a secret mission to observe a war in North Africa he found out than it was safe for him to know even after he had secretly been surgically trans
    Cover Artist Alan AldridgeWhen John Bravais was sent on a secret mission to observe a war in North Africa he found out than it was safe for him to know even after he had secretly been surgically transformed so that he was as strong as a Bolo tank, and nearly as tough Wolf like aliens, invisible to the ordinary eye, were harvesting the brains of the fallen fightersCover Artist Alan AldridgeWhen John Bravais was sent on a secret mission to observe a war in North Africa he found out than it was safe for him to know even after he had secretly been surgically transformed so that he was as strong as a Bolo tank, and nearly as tough Wolf like aliens, invisible to the ordinary eye, were harvesting the brains of the fallen fighters Brevais might have become the Ultimate Warrior, but still he was only one man against A Plague of Demons.

    One Reply to “Plague of Demons”

    1. The action never stops. It starts out as a spy novel & winds up spanning the galaxy, so check your suspension of disbelief at the door & just roll with it. Even has Bolos in it, although they're not called that. Fun.

    2. 3.5 stars. Better than a 3 star effort but not quite good enough to warrant 4 stars. A fun, quick read with plenty of action from start to finish. Not big on substance but I can definitely say the book is never boring.Nominee: Nebula Award for Best Science Fiction Novel (1966)

    3. Though little discussed today, back in the 1960s, Syracuse, N.Y.-born Keith Laumer was a hugely popular sci-fi author, largely by dint of his series featuring interstellar ambassador/mediator Jaime Retief, a series that began in '63 and ultimately comprised some 18 novels and books of short stories. Somehow, I managed to miss the entire Retief bandwagon back when, and only recently realized that I still had not read a single Laumer book from any of his major series--the Retief series was just on [...]

    4. Does anyone else have those moments of "only-ness" where you're, say, listening to an old CD in the car and suddenly realize you're probably the only person in the whole world listening to "Wake Up Stop Dreaming" from Wang Chung's "To Live and Die in L.A." soundtrack right now? That's how I feel reading some of these old sci-fi paperbacks - and I'm pretty sure I'm the only person on the planet who spent this past week reading Keith Laumer's Plague of Demons. So yeah - probably some SPOILERS here [...]

    5. This book was great, classic Laumer. The premise is your typical alien-invaders plot, but he takes it in some really cool directions. For the last third of the book he twists everything upside-down, almost like a completely different story. Great stuff, and maybe you'd see it coming but it totally caught me off guard. Very well executed.If you haven't read any of my prior Laumer reviews, let me just say that he's all about action and moving the story along. This is not to say that his stories ar [...]

    6. I received a number of hand-me-down, old, science-fiction books from a relative, and Plague of Demons was one of them. Although the story is copyright 1965, it has held up remarkably well over the decades. As the story moved into it's second "phase" it became harder to relate to it, but the lead character provided a continuity and perspective that kept it interesting.

    7. I do not know why I bought this book, way back in 1981 or 82. Maybe it was the cover. I remember enjoying it at that time, but cannot remember much of the story now, expect for the fact that it was a sort of one-man war against shape-shifting aliens. And there was a cute little handheld computer which helped the protagonist throughout.

    8. Read about half of this before giving up. Was hoping for some fun, action-packed, retro sci-fi like WASP, but this fell far short. The writing seemed sloppy, the dialogue was terrible and over-stuffed with metaphors. It was supposed to be in the future, but I only remembered that once in a while when he mentioned something tech related.

    9. Keith Laumer, A Plague of Demons (Paperback Library, 1965)Keith Laumer may be a science fiction writer, but don't let that fool you. I'd bet a week's pay the guy was sitting there at his typewriter in a trenchcoat and fedora, unfiltered Lucky hanging from his lip, reading back his prose in a Bogart voice. The first two-thirds of this book is straight out of the world of hardboiled detective fiction. Well, okay, as long as you leave out the dog-faced aliens, invisibility suits, anti-gravity devic [...]

    10. From my blog:Full disclosure: I bought A Plague of Demons by Keith Laumer purely for the cover. I haven't heard of the book before, or its author, but I'm an admirer of the legendary Alan Aldridge who designed the cover for this book and the rest in the series, and on the back of these he was made Art Director at Penguin, in 1965. I decided to read it this week because it's been a while since I've dipped in to some vintage SF.There is an Edgar Allan Poe story called The Man Who Was Used Up, in w [...]

    11. I read this long ago -- long enough that I didn't remember it, but it all came back as I reread it. Pretty good, although a bit thin and of course dated. The first part is about aliens and powered armor ("PAPA"), and it's interesting to consider how our conceptions have changed -- personal enhancement today would be much more about communications and computer assistance, and I hope Laumer wasn't just pretending to forget conservation of energy to make things simpler.Unfortunately, in the second [...]

    12. Product Description When John Bravais was sent on a secret mission to observe a war in North Africa he found out more than it was safe for him to know—even after he had secretly been surgically transformed so that he was as strong as a Bolo tank, and nearly as tough: Wolf-like aliens, invisible to the ordinary eye, were harvesting the brains of the fallen fighters! Bravais might have become the Ultimate Warrior, but still he was only one man against A Plague of Demons.

    13. I first read this book about 45 years ago, one of the first science fiction books I ever read, after Slan and Childhood's End, and it stuck with me. It has a haunting atmosphere, kind of a sticky miasma of horror that clings even after finishing the book. Some years ago, I searched it out and re-read it and it still had that impact. A good, fast read. Perhaps not a masterpiece but definitely a good read.

    14. Fast paced, imaginative, fun, good with a couple moments of greatness, and still worthwhile even considering how long ago it ws written. I like Laumer a lot, and I look forward to reading his most serious efforts. He has huge potential.

    15. Non-stop action. Laumer at his tautest. Truly mind-blowing paranoia stretching to galactic proportions. A great small work by an under-rated writer. Also see A Trace of Memory.

    16. Laumer had a gift for little felicities that often remain after you've forgotten most of the story. This book was not my first introduction to the idea that good can be as destructive a force as evil, but it expresses it well.

    17. I bought this book at a thrift store because the cover was so awesome. The book was pretty awesome too. Not as cool as the cover though. I mean, a brain in a bag is pretty cool.

    18. 6/10.Strange book about a man who is faced with dealing with aliens who are harvesting humans. A fairly standard read.

    19. At its best before Bravais finds out what's going on, when he's in a war zone and at his most cynical (but my introduction to Laumer was the Retief stories).

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