• Title: Bend Me, Shape Me
  • Author: Debra R. Borys
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 472
  • Format: None
  • Bend Me Shape Me Bend Me Shape Me is the second novel in the Street Stories suspense series and tells the story of Snow Ramirez a bi polar street kid about to turn She s convinced that psychiatrist Mordechai Levi
    Bend Me, Shape Me is the second novel in the Street Stories suspense series and tells the story of Snow Ramirez, a bi polar street kid about to turn 18 She s convinced that psychiatrist Mordechai Levinson is responsible for one kid s suicide, and may be targeting her brother Alley as his next victim Once again, reporter Jo Sullivan finds herself the only person willing tBend Me, Shape Me is the second novel in the Street Stories suspense series and tells the story of Snow Ramirez, a bi polar street kid about to turn 18 She s convinced that psychiatrist Mordechai Levinson is responsible for one kid s suicide, and may be targeting her brother Alley as his next victim Once again, reporter Jo Sullivan finds herself the only person willing to listen to one of Chicago s throwaway youth Snow Ramirez hasn t trusted anyone in a very long time, not even herself Memories of her childhood on Washington s Yakama Reservation haunt her even on the streets of Chicago When her squat mate Blitz slits his own throat in front of her, she knows it s time to convince someone to trust her instincts Blitz may have been diagnosed bi polar, like Snow herself, but no way would he have offed himself like that if the shrink he d been seeing hadn t bent his mind completely out of shape.Normally she wouldn t care Who wasn t crazy in one way or another in this messed up world After all, she d gotten out from under the doctor s thumb weeks ago and it was too late for Blitz now, wasn t it Snow s little brother Alley, though, there might still be time to save him If only she can get reporter Jo Sullivan to believe her story before Snow loses her own mind.

    One Reply to “Bend Me, Shape Me”

    1. Review also posted at Ja čitam, a ti?Being a reader makes you discover different things about yourself. For example, I'm huge fan of tv-crime shows and I watched who knows how many CSI and Criminal Minds episodes but when it comes to suspense or crime books I tend to avoid them. They simply don't do it for me, but maybe I will discover some book that will change my mind. This one was a nice and interesting read but it didn't bring that epiphany, nor did I expect it to. It wouldn't be fair to se [...]

    2. Living on the Chicago streets is hard and at times life threatening. When a friend commits suicide in front of her, Snow whether it was a result of mental illness or did someone drive her friend over the edge. Now that her brother is at risk, she has to decide whom to trust a reporter with an agenda to promote or the psychiatrist trained to help. The author does a fine job of portraying the grittiness of street living. The reporter’s character shows how people living there become invisible to [...]

    3. Living on the Chicago streets is hard and at times life threatening. When a friend commits suicide in front of her, Snow whether it was a result of mental illness or did someone drive her friend over the edge. Now that her brother is at risk, she has to decide whom to trust a reporter with an agenda to promote or the psychiatrist trained to help. The author does a fine job of portraying the grittiness of street living. The reporter’s character shows how people living there become invisible to [...]

    4. While the cover did little to impress me, I was curious after reading the synopsis of Bend Me, Shape Me. I am delighted I agreed to read and review this novel. Borys offers fascinating characters, a look at inner city homeless children and combines it with a suspenseful mystery that kept me flipping the pages. This is the second book in the Street Stories series but each work as a standalone. Three world review: suspenseful, enlightening and well done.The tale begins with Blitz and Snow in an ab [...]

    5. There must be something in the air or some odd convergence of planets since I’ve had a group of books that I have read lately that, at least tangentially, deal with characters that are “less than” in society’s eyes. Bend Me, Shape Me is no different. Debra Borys deals with the issue of underground teenaged runaways. Often squatting in abandoned buildings, abused in birth families and targeted for abuse by the predatory denizens of the city, and often with recurrent and severe mental illn [...]

    6. The is the second book in the Street Stories series by Debra Borys, the first, Painted Black, I also had the privilege of reviewing.The focus again is on the lives of young homeless kids living on the streets. Kids, especially those trapped in this type of life, should be able to trust those in positions to help them – like psychiatrists. But something feels all too wrong Snow’s roommate commits suicide. Again Jo Sullivan is the one who steps up to help those without a voice. True to Borys s [...]

    7. Again Debra R. Bory's has nailed it in her sequel of the Street Stories, Bend Me Shape Me. A riveting story that will keep you on your toes until the end. I dare you to to read Bend Me Shape Me, it's not about the elite but about unfortunate circumstances that unfold for 18 year Snow Ramirez and her brother Alley and the unfortunate circumstances the behold her friend. Witnessing what her friend felt necessary to do made Snow think that a diagnosis of bipolar was not enough to push her friend ov [...]

    8. This is the second in the 'Street Stories' series of suspense novels that highlight the trials and tribulations of young kids homeless and on the street. Focussing on Snow and her brother Alley (Alejandro), Jo Sullivan must investigate concerns that a psychiatrist working with the youngsters is driving them to suicide. Snow is concerned her brother may be next after her friend slits his throat after a session with this psychiatrist. Can Jo solve the mystery or will her own demons refuse to let h [...]

    9. Bend Me, Shape Me (Debra R. Borys)18 tear old Snow Ramirez is a bi-polar girl living on the streets of Chicago. When she finds a homeless boy dead she fears for herself and her brother Alley. She is convinced that psychiatrist Mordechai Levinson is somehow behind the murder and she feels they are next.She seeks the help or reporter Jo Sullivan, she is the only one who seems interested in what they young girl has to say. Not only are they trying to find out what Dr. Levinson is up too, Snow is re [...]

    10. I have the same problem with this book as with the other ones. Snow is mentally sick and should be taken care of. The psychiatrist she has been seeing is insane and cannot help, obviously. But someone must prescribe her meds, it is impossible to believe she only sees this doctor and no assistant? Once again, I don't believe foster homes are great, but they cannot all be horrible. And when kids are taken away from their families, it is usually to bring hem back there after things have settled dow [...]

    11. This story is another heart wrenching look into the life of kids on the street. I was immediately drawn into Snow's story and the book didn't let go until the end. It was quite a ride. The reader will feel sorrow and shock and even some dislike for some of the characters. There's a little bit of violence, action, and even some questions of what's real and what's not. The story comes out in the characters own voices and each one is unique. Bend Me Shape Me is book two in the "Street Stories" seri [...]

    12. Although the story of Bend Me, Shape Me is an engrossing thriller and a satisfying read for that reason alone, what I found most interesting was the light it shines on the issues faced by homeless kids. Sure, the book has the normal disclaimers about not being about real people, and I believe that. But prominent in the author’s bio is her experience working with organizations that help such kids. I’ve got to believe the issues, experiences, and difficulties of runaways and throwaways are dep [...]

    13. This book is both engrossing and riveting. I was immediately drawn into the story by Debra Borys' deft handling of the drama and the raw, gritty dialogue. She's got a knack for capturing the futility of life as revealed in the characters struggling with their own demons and hardships. This is some powerful writing.

    14. This is a must read interview with Debra about the plight of teen homelessness which her new book and her series is based onthereadingfrenzy/

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