• Title: The Feast of Artemis
  • Author: Anne Zouroudi
  • ISBN: 9781408837511
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Feast of Artemis The olive harvest is drawing to a close in the town of Dendra and when Hermes Diaktoros arrives for the celebratory festival he expects an indulgent day of food and wine But as young men leap a blazi
    The olive harvest is drawing to a close in the town of Dendra, and when Hermes Diaktoros arrives for the celebratory festival he expects an indulgent day of food and wine But as young men leap a blazing bonfire in feats of daring, one of them is badly burned Did he fall, or was he pushed Then, as Hermes learns of a deep running feud between two families, one of their paThe olive harvest is drawing to a close in the town of Dendra, and when Hermes Diaktoros arrives for the celebratory festival he expects an indulgent day of food and wine But as young men leap a blazing bonfire in feats of daring, one of them is badly burned Did he fall, or was he pushed Then, as Hermes learns of a deep running feud between two families, one of their patriarchs dies Determined to find out why, Hermes follows a bitter trail through the olive groves to reveal a motive for murder, and uncovers a dark deed brought to light by the sin of gluttony.

    One Reply to “The Feast of Artemis”

    1. Don't read this one on an empty stomach! The extensive descriptions of various food and drink items will leave you wanting some. This was the last of the author's Seven Deadly Sins Mysteries--and covers the sin of gluttony. I had no idea how Zouroudi would construct a mystery based on gluttony, but she's delivered us a gastronomic delight. Hermes Diaktoros from Athens, aka the fat man, is back in top form, with his white tennis shoes and his capacious hold-all. He is visiting the Greek country t [...]

    2. Didn't finish this one. The story was possibly quite good but I got bogged down with the obsession with the 'fatness' of the main character, to the point that I just didn't care any more.

    3. the Fat Man is back ("not so fat asg") with his trusty carry-all, white tennis shows, and foppish mannerisms "Feast of Artemis" (a Seven Deadly Sins Mystery). our trusty and stalwart hero treks to the town of Dendra where he encounters the usual human drama of vengeance, pettiness, ignorance, pride, greed and ::gasp:: murder. Our man is here to clean house.Hermes Diaktoros is our large, wise guy, who travels extensively, and is your basic problem solver. Who is this guy? He identifies himself as [...]

    4. This is a story that highlights how one misguided decision or action can ripple across the lives of people who have no contact, no place, in the situation or the lives of the perpetrators. How angers, feuds, and small or big revenges can be taken up against the wrong people by these acts and high feelings and furthered by unfair and baseless innuendo and outright lies. The comment, "But everyone knows this" is accounted fact and lives and livelihoods can be destroyed.While gluttony is the 'deadl [...]

    5. I thought this was one of her best. Excellent plot and I learned a lot about olive oil too. And we're introduced to Hermes' ne'er-do-well half brother Dino (possibly short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine?). So are the brothers gods or men? Oh, certainly they are men, but then again it's hard to be sure. And we do know that Hermes acts on behalf of the highest Authorities, never specified in the books.

    6. It's the day of the annual feast-day in a small Greek town, and the rivalry between two families is about to become violent. Almost unnoticed, a fat man arrives in town, along with his riotous, drunken brother. Slipping from shop to shop, gossiping with the locals, Hermes, the messenger of the gods, is here to bring justice. Well written, well plotted (all the clues are there, but carefully woven into the details of Greek small-town life), and I really liked the twist of having a Greek god act a [...]

    7. I thought with the Seventh Deadly Sin we might learn more about Hermes Diaktoros and the Higher Authorities he serves (who clearly pay well) We meet his feckless boozy brother but that's it and I found I was quite relieved to have the mystery preserved.The book begins rather tantalisingly in standard crime fashion, with the discovery of a body but it's not what you'd think.The fat man is a little less comfortable with his girth in this outing, and not surprising with all the delicious food and d [...]

    8. I’ve enjoyed all the books in the series so far but this one may just be my favourite – Anne Zouroudi just gets better and better. The feuding between the two families of olive growers sets the background to the story and Hermes of course is on hand to see that justice is done – if not by the book then by some higher authority. Each time I read a book by this author, not only does it bring back great memories of Greece but I also learn something new. The writing just captures the mystery o [...]

    9. I enjoy this type of book.It gently introduces the reader to a distinctly different country,way of life and a very different detective.Food and drink play a very big part in the story and plot.This is the first novel I have read by this author but I will look out for more.Anne Zouroudi has created a scenic and gastronomic view of Greece with a fat man to solve all the puzzles.

    10. Enjoyable series about a detective who serves "a higher power". The series is only 7 books, one for each deadly sin. Still, the setting, always in Greece, is well-described, and Hermes is not your average human. I really enjoy the way he sets out to set things right, but not always the usual punishment.

    11. I read this, and others in the series, over a wet and miserable Winter, and was transported to the sun-soaked olive groves of Greece every time I opened the pages. Yes the stories are hardly complex and the resolutions tie things up a little too tidily, but for pure escapism they can't be beaten. Get in some olives and ouzo and enjoy!

    12. I've read all but one of the books in this excellent series. In this story, Hermes Diaktoris, AKA the Fatman, is on one of the islands that is renowned for olive oil. I leaned a lot about how olive oil is made-fascinating. And the story about two feuding families, which leads to murder and a terrible injury is very well told.

    13. These books always make me want to hop onto the next plane to Greece. That is not a bad thing, I guess? I am very sorry that the series is over with this one, I'd have enjoyed reading more, but am thankful for the seven books we were given. Fare well, Hermes!

    14. I am glad I read all 7 books. The author writes in detail about the food and how it is prepared. That is certainly interesting. The details of the land and of the people that live in these books make you realize that it is a very rustic area to live.

    15. Another vintage Hermes adventure, showing him at his most resourceful and enterprising - and through the appearance of his riotous half-brother, offering a tantalising hint to his real identity too bad this is the last one of the series

    16. I really like the this series and this one in particular resonated for some reason. As ever the fat man arrives in a remote part of Greece to solve a mystery and right some old wrongs. You can almost taste the wine and the olive oil in this book.

    17. I would like to see a "rejected" category for the books started, but for one reason or another, not finished. This murder is sexually graphic, not to my taste and I did not finish it.

    18. i borrowed it today,and finished it today. it is an enjoyable read. it is a crime novel with a nemesis as the detective. i thought it was one of her old books, but it seems it is her latest.

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