• Title: The Body Emblazoned: Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture
  • Author: Jonathan Sawday
  • ISBN: 9780415157193
  • Page: 473
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Body Emblazoned Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture An outstanding piece of interdisciplinary scholarship The Body Emblazoned is a study of the Renaissance culture of dissection which informed intellectual inquiry in Europe for nearly two hundred year
    An outstanding piece of interdisciplinary scholarship, The Body Emblazoned is a study of the Renaissance culture of dissection which informed intellectual inquiry in Europe for nearly two hundred years Though the dazzling displays in Renaissance art and literature of the exterior of the body have long been a subject of enquiry, Jonathan Sawday considers in detail the inteAn outstanding piece of interdisciplinary scholarship, The Body Emblazoned is a study of the Renaissance culture of dissection which informed intellectual inquiry in Europe for nearly two hundred years Though the dazzling displays in Renaissance art and literature of the exterior of the body have long been a subject of enquiry, Jonathan Sawday considers in detail the interior of the body, and what it meant to men and women in early modern culture Sawday links the frequently illicit activities of the great anatomists of the period, to whose labors we are indebted for so much of our understanding of the structure and operation of the human body, to a wider cultural discourse which embraces not only the great moments of Renaissance art, but the very foundation of a modern idea of knowledge Illustrated with thirty two black and white prints, The Body Emblazoned re assesses modern understanding not only of the literature and culture of the Renaissance, but of the modern organization of knowledge which is now so familiar that it is only rarely questioned.

    One Reply to “The Body Emblazoned: Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture”

    1. Sawday’s book from 1995 adds to the ongoing academic project of historicising the body by framing it via the concepts of anatomisation, dissection and partitions. Treating these both literally and metaphorically, it explores constructs of the human body in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when the body wasn’t viewed through a medical-scientific discourse, but in more diverse ways: via cosmology, theology, and the vexed struggle of body and anima.Sawday’s material is broad, from the [...]

    2. The beginning two chapters were easily the strongest, and the rest were kind of boring. But Sawday is a pretty gutsy writer and draws astonishing parallels. I appreciate him greatly as a theorist.

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