• Title: The Story: A Reporter's Journey
  • Author: JudithMiller
  • ISBN: 9781476716015
  • Page: 203
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Story A Reporter s Journey Star reporter for the New York Times the world s most powerful newspaper foreign correspondent in some of the most dangerous fields Pulitzer winner longest jailed correspondent for protecting her sou
    Star reporter for the New York Times, the world s most powerful newspaper foreign correspondent in some of the most dangerous fields Pulitzer winner longest jailed correspondent for protecting her sources, Judith Miller is highly controversial In this memoir, she turns her reporting skills on herself with the intensity of her professional vocation.Judy Miller grew up nStar reporter for the New York Times, the world s most powerful newspaper foreign correspondent in some of the most dangerous fields Pulitzer winner longest jailed correspondent for protecting her sources, Judith Miller is highly controversial In this memoir, she turns her reporting skills on herself with the intensity of her professional vocation.Judy Miller grew up near the Nevada atomic proving ground She got a job at the New York Times after a suit by women employees about discrimination at the paper and went on to cover national politics, head the paper s bureau in Cairo, and serve as deputy editor in Paris and then deputy at the powerful Washington bureau She reported on terrorism and the rise of fanatical Islam in the Middle East and on secret biological weapons plants and programs in Iraq, Iran, and Russia She covered an administration traumatized by 9 11 and an anthrax attack three weeks later Miller shared a Pulitzer for her reporting.She turns her journalistic skills on herself and her controversial reporting which marshaled evidence that led America to invade Iraq She writes about the mistakes she and others made on the existence in Iraq of weapons of mass destruction She addresses the motives of some of her sources, including the notorious Iraqi Chalabi and the CIA She describes going to jail to protect her sources in the Scooter Libby investigation of the outing of CIA agent Valerie Plame and how the Times subsequently abandoned her after twenty eight years.The Story describes the real life of a foreign and investigative reporter It is an adventure story, told with bluntness and wryness.

    One Reply to “The Story: A Reporter's Journey”

    1. 3 1/2 stars. Part soap opera, part apologia, but lots of very interesting info; about her months in jail (to preserve confidentiality of her news source)--, also eye-opening was her early investigation for her book "Germs" where she researched the huge stockpiles and labs of the USSR and also bin Laden of anthrax and other bio weapons; this was sickening to read. The bulk of the book of course is about her reporting about WMD in Iraq, reporting which turned out to be wrong. Turns out this was *n [...]

    2. At the moment there seems to be a move to resurrect the narrative that the Bush administration lied about the WMD intelligence reports in order to start a war with Iraq. I'm sure it's just a coincidence that there is a Democrat running for President who voted for that war, who needs to blame that vote on somebody else.At any rate, Judith Miller's book is a timely reminder that there used to be such a thing as journalism, where stories needed at least two corroborating sources, and reporters were [...]

    3. From touring enormous bio warfare factories in Russia, to facing down Taliban with AK-47s, to witnessing hangings and bombings, Judith Miller has been an excellent witness and reporter for thirty years.In some ways her reports on the infighting and backroom politics of the New York Times is almost as scary as the real threats I mentioned. Suffice it to say, I will never read NYT again.I have nothing but awe and respect for her intellectual perseverance and honesty. You have to read this book.

    4. In this book, Judith Miller has presented a very cogent version of her side of the story, detailing and exposing the underbelly of the news and publishing industry as she reveals the major events of her almost three decade career with the New York Times and then, the decade after; it is not a pretty picture. Many of the negative reviews of the book are not critical reviews, but personally insulting diatribes. They seem to be from the same type of people; they seem to be from very angry ideologue [...]

    5. Excellent book. It was obvious to me that when liberals realized that the intelligence about WMD was faulty, they looked for someone to blame to absolve themselves of any responsibility for their own judgment on the intelligence. It was easy to blame the Bush administration by repeating (until it became the prevailing "wisdom") the mantra “Bush lied, people died.” (I'll bet Hillary Clinton will take zero responsibility for her vote for the Iraq war in the upcoming presidential election and I [...]

    6. This book is autobiographical, so in that sense, I guess some might claim that it is "self-serving." However, this woman dedicated her life to journalism and getting the story "right." She has been described as "pushy" and "Miss Run Amok," by her colleagues, and that might be true, or it may be just tinged with professional jealousy because Miller delivered some pretty powerful stories, and informed us about WMD and biological warfare, the rise of Islamic terrorism long before it became headline [...]

    7. On the surface Ms. Miller's book is a professional biography which, while long on apologetic detail is quite interesting. Under the surface it is a sad reminder of what journalistic ethics, foreign news gathering, and the New York Times used to be, but are no longer. The final take away is the pathetic need of the FasciLib literati to scape goat their collective support of a war that became unpopular, and the cowardly complicity of the Times leadership, for whom it meant sacrificing the career o [...]

    8. Her description of the run-up to the Iraq War rings true. Her years of reporting on the Middle East made her dogged search for weapons of mass destruction credible. She often shared a by-line with experienced male reporters as well, working hand-in-hand with them. But female reporters of her era had it tough, very tough. She and another female, Valerie Plame (formerly of the CIA), took the fall for men who had enormous power in the G.W. Bush administration. Every citizen who wonders how investig [...]

    9. good writer, but for some reason I couldn't get into the parts (lots of the book) about the search for WMD in Iraq, controversies about her reporting in the run-up to that war, etc. I guess it was covered very thoroughly at the time, so at this point the only way it might hold my attention is if you had some sort of debate -- someone who thinks she was irresponsible going back and forth with her about it. in this format where it's all her side, i was actually more taken with her account of the i [...]

    10. I had been anxiously awaiting this one to move up my holds list at the Iibrary and it was worth the wait. Definitely makes you sympathize with Miller and rationalize the way she was totally duped (like the rest of the country) about Iraq and WMD. Very dense with military terms at times but once I got into it, I was hooked.

    11. Extremely detailed account of her reporting based on information from vetted sources leading up to our invasion of Iraq. Keeping the names of all of the players involved was difficult for me but necessary to tell the story. Well written. Very informative.

    12. Comprehensive look a reporter's fascinating career reporting on the Middle East, terrorism, both Iraq wars, as well as her role in the notorious WMD and Valerie Plame stories.The truth is rarely simple, and sadly, even more rarely found in today's media.

    13. I've never read any of Judith's writings before but I thought this was a great, not always pleasant, story of her experience in the newspaper business and taking on difficult stories in war zones and what she was willing to go to prison over to retain her standards and convictions.

    14. Fascinating bio with insights on internal politics at the NYT, and Washington politics. I skipped huge swathes of this (mostly interested in her WMD coverage), but Miller is a riveting storyteller.

    15. Judith Miller, a reporter for the New York Times for 28 years shares her story of pre Iraq war and the belief she had there were weapons of mass destruction in Saddam's Iraq.

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