• Title: Braided Creek
  • Author: Jim Harrison Ted Kooser
  • ISBN: 9781556591884
  • Page: 447
  • Format: Hardcover
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    Braided Creek After Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser had exchanged letters and poems for years Kooser was diagnosed with cancer Ted s poetry became overwhelmingly vivid Harrison recalls Then we decided to correspond i
    After Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser had exchanged letters and poems for years, Kooser was diagnosed with cancer Ted s poetry became overwhelmingly vivid, Harrison recalls Then we decided to correspond in short poems, because that was the essence of what we wanted to say to each other Braided Creek contains over 300 poems exchanged in this longstanding correspondence.After Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser had exchanged letters and poems for years, Kooser was diagnosed with cancer Ted s poetry became overwhelmingly vivid, Harrison recalls Then we decided to correspond in short poems, because that was the essence of what we wanted to say to each other Braided Creek contains over 300 poems exchanged in this longstanding correspondence Wise, wry, and penetrating, the poems touch upon numerous subjects, from the natural world to the nature of time Harrison and Kooser decided to remain silent over who wrote which poem, allowing their voices, ideas, and images to swirl and merge into this remarkable suite of lyrics.Each time I go outside the worldis different This has happened all my life The moon put her handover my mouth and told meto shut up and watch A nephew rubs the sore feetof his aunt, and the rope that lifts us all toward gracecreaks on the pulley Under the storyteller s hatare many heads, all troubled Jim Harrison, one of America s best loved writers, is author of two dozen books of poetry, fiction, essays, food criticism, and memoir He is best known for a collection of novellas, Legends of the Fall, and the epic novel Dalva He lives in western Montana and southern Arizona.Ted Kooser is the author of eight collections of poetry and a prose memoir His poetry appears regularly in The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, Poetry, and The Nation He lives in Nebraska.

    One Reply to “Braided Creek”

    1. My friend Jen said she was reading this book which I had read more than once decades ago, so I thought I would read it again as she was reading it so we could talk about it. And I recall that Jim Harrison, whose work I know pretty well, died this year, RIP. Most people know his Legends of the Fall and other novels sometimes made into films, and I like those books, but I really like his poetry, too. Ted Kooser I am less familiar with; he wrote a book called Winter Morning Walks: 100 Postcards to [...]

    2. "Under the storyteller’s hatare many heads, all troubled.Rowing across the lakeall the dragonflies are screwing.Stop it. It’s Sunday.Only todayI heardthe riverwithin the river.I want to describe my life in hushed toneslike a TV nature program. Dawn in the north.His nose stalks the air for newborn coffee.Nothing to do.Nowhere to go.The moth just drownedin the whiskey glass.This is heaven.Let go of the mind, the thousand bluestory fragments we tell ourselveseach day to keep the world underfoot [...]

    3. Along with Winter Morning Walks, these are two books I read every year around this time of year. I couldn't do without them.

    4. Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser wrote poems back and forth in their letters. I love their collaboration and the exchanges. I feel like I've been invited into their lives--it feels personal and intimate.I love the fact that the two poets refused to claim authorship for individual poems in the correspondence, saying, "Everyone gets tired of this continuing cult of personalityThis book is an assertion in favor of poetry and against credentials."Kooser was a poet laureate of the United States for a few [...]

    5. Comment after first 45 pages.This is wonderful. I find myself with a huge grin or pausing for introspection on nearly every page. Brilliant idea and lovely in its execution.----Definitely 4+.Two dear friends corresponding via poems, "American Haiku," and aphorisms. I love that there is no ownership of the poems. From the back cover, "When asked about attributions for the individual poems, one of them replied, 'Everyone gets tired of this continuing cult of the personality . . . This book is an a [...]

    6. I'm reluctant to say I'm done with this book and I'll probably end up purchasing it. Most of the poems are three lines written back and forth on postcards, semi-haikus of wisdom, wit and the bittersweetness of life.Some favorites:When she left meI stood out in the thunderstorm,hoping to be destroyed by lightning.It missed, first left, then right.I grow older.I still like women, but mostlyI like Mexican food.The face you look out ofis never the faceyour lover looks into.Straining on the toiletwe [...]

    7. An easy 5 stars. This is a book I could carry around for a few months. It's certainly not going on my actual shelves any time soon. Two old poets hold forth in short spurts. If you like like haiku, or asian verse, and if you'd like to know how the American idiom can comfortably extend the forms this is the book for you. If you'd like a master class in writing but hate the how-to books, this is for you. Here's what: this book can teach you how to see, and it can teach you how to think about what [...]

    8. This is a brief book of poetry, but the conceit behind it makes it a mesmerizing collection of work by two fantastic poets. Jim Harrison, a legend in his own right, exchanges poems with his friend Ted Kooser, who was diagnosed with cancer. Through their exchange of poetry, they communicate the experiences of their lives in a way that would truly unable to be captured through prose. The book was published with the intent to not attribute any of the poems within the book to either author, and in d [...]

    9. Ted Kooser and Jim Harrison coauthored this slim volume of epigrammatic poems to emphasize the poetry itself rather than the poets who wrote it. Toward that end, the poems appear on the pages with no attribution—it's never clear whether you're reading Kooser or Harrison (though if you've read much of either of them, you can often guess).The quality of these short poems (none more than three or four lines) is very high. I don't give this volume a perfect rating, however, because reading so many [...]

    10. This is an easy book to cozy up to for just a few minutes a day or for an entire cup of tea-true poetry, raw and simple. I laughed, questioned and was moved deeply by simple short phrases. Some of my favorites:"How can it be that everyone my age is older than me?""Dewdrops are the dreams of the grass.They linger, shining,into the morning.""The imagination's kisses are a cloud of butterflies.""I hope there's time for this and that,and not just this."

    11. It took a little time to get into the style of this book. It is written by two different people, and the fact that there is no notation of who wrote what (the book is written like one long poem) felt off at first. It made it difficult to discern sometimes when the writing had moved from one person to the next, and there were a few spots when it would have been nice to know that detail.

    12. "Everyone gets tired of this continuing cult of the personalityThis book is an assertion in favor of poetry and against credentials."

    13. Beautiful pieces with wonderful point of view, little reminders to take things slowly and see with fresh eyes. Love the collaboration and relationship between the two poets.

    14. I love this book, in part because it is the type of poetry that I aspire to write. It is witty, real, approachable and paints vivid word pictures with tongue in cheek observations. I love that this is a conversation in poems and I also love that one doesn't know who exactly is talking when. Years ago my husband and I went to a poetry reading of Ted Kooser's and I fell in love with his poems. More recently I saw Jim Harrison on Anthony Bourdain's Parts Unknown and I enjoyed his observations. This [...]

    15. Pas simple de se dire, "ah ben là, je vais me faire un recueil de poésie!" Qui n'a pas de souvenirs atroces de mois entiers à étudier des classiques de la poésie française au lycée Même les littéraires devraient admettre que pour la majorité d'entre nous, "Le Lac" de Lamartine ou "Nuit du Walpurgis Classique" de Verlaine (ne me demandez pas comment je peux me souvenir de titres de poèmes étudiés il y a une vingtaine d'années et don le contenu a complètement disparu de mon petit ce [...]

    16. Ted Kooser and Jim Harrison, two of my favorites, though Jim Harrison more for his novels and novellas than his poetry. These short poems were included in letters written to each other over their long friendship. Interestingly, they don't identify who wrote what. "Everyone gets tired of this continuing cult of the personality.The book is an assertion in favor of poetry and against credentials," explained one of them, thought it's not clear which one!Words to read and reread, letting the images a [...]

    17. Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser wrote poems back and forth to each other as part of their letter writing. This book gathers some of these little aphoristic poems, none more than 4 lines long. It leaves them unattributed, so you do not know who wrote which (though with some, if you're familiar with the poets at all, it's obvious). According to the back cover, they did this because "Everyone gets tired of this continuing cult of the personality . . . This book is an assertion in favor of poetry and ag [...]

    18. There is a playfulness in the dialogue between these two poets that is very enjoyable. This is not a diabolically philosophical book, nor is it post-modern nonsensical. These are snippets of poetry set in indirect communication with each other.The result, I think, is a field--in the way physicists think of the term--which conveys a sort of philosophy overall. Emotion is transmitted without being discussed. The atmosphere is both forlorn and satisfied, quietly comic and wistful.This can be a one- [...]

    19. I don't like the fact that there is no attribution in this book of tiny haiku-like poems. Initially. I found myself thinking more about "which guy wrote this one" than about what was being written. By mid-way through, I felt certain I knew. Having read all of Kooser's works, and some of Harrison's fiction, it was not that hard. The two of them prove that friends can be very different sorts of people. While I love Kooser, I did find some of these very humorous, and I am sure they were Harrison's. [...]

    20. Some authors write in such a way that even with four lines of a poem, I'm taken to vividly see and experience some place I had not planned on going. This small book is one four-liner after another and for me, a constant passport punching from farm life to listening to an aging man express a somber freedom he's starting to realize as he's finally let go of the allures of notoriety. I want to write like these guys do. I want to learn to tell stories like they do, that with four short lines, the pe [...]

    21. A friend gave me this book as a gift and I can't thank him enough. It has moved to the top of the list as my all time favorite book of Haiku. Two long time friends (both writers) correspond over the years and eventually their letters become just brief poems to one another. The poems cover a gamut of life experiences and wonderful descriptions of the natural world. The individual poems do not list which writer did them as they state on the back of the book "Everyone gets tired of this continuing [...]

    22. I'm a little on the fence with this book. It's not great by any stretch of the imagination, but it's an enjoyable quick read. Looked at in terms of something that will make you want to write, it does a fine job. It reminds you that poetry is everywhere and is not all that hard or difficult but can be a few lines scribbled between friends. My favorite mini poem in here was about topographic maps being fingerprints of God.

    23. A short, simple book of aphorisms and small poems that Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser wrote to one another when Kooser was ill. They don't attribute specific lines to one another. Some lines made me laugh out loud, some were sentimental, some reminded you of the joys and burdens of the mundane, and a handful were on aging. Very little was inspiring or awed me with beauty, but I don't think those were the purpose of this book.A quick, easy, enjoyable read.

    24. "There are mornings when everything brims with promise even my empty cup." Enjoyed this conversation immensely. I think communicating is like playing catch. Clearly these two know how to write poetry and how to play catch. The fact that you don't know through out the book who wrote which poem is also wonderful. In true conversation it is not who said what, but what is said together. It's a quick read, enjoyable, with many wonderful short lines. I highly recommend this poetry conversation.

    25. this is a collaboration between Harrison and Ted Kooser, and whether or not you like the works of either of these authors, "Creek" is a kind of miracle. None of the brief poems are attributed to either man; they say that the poems were truly jointly constructed. A casual vivid elegance graces the book, and in the poems time is real.

    26. From the back of the book: "Longtime friends, Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser always exchanged poems in their letter writing. After Kooser was diagnosed with cancer several years ago, Harrison found that his friend's poetry became "overwhelmingly vivid," and they began a correspondence comprised entirely of breif poems, "because that was the essence of what we wanted to say to each other."

    27. Just finished this for the second time after giving it as a gift to my father, a burgeoning poet. Not all of the poems are great, but many of them are -- as poised and evocative as the classic Asian poems revered by both men. I truly love this book for what it is: A conversation between artists -- elegant, fluent, honest, surprising.

    28. I really like the concept of this booko male friends who wrote poems instead of letters to each other to describe things in their lives. Each poem is only 3 lines and, while some of them seem simple, others are really powerful. I read this in one night and it made me stop to about the poems I could write daily in my life.

    29. A look at a correspondence between two great poets. The book is snippets of their poetry that captures their daily lives and concerns. Beautiful reading and great for people who want to read poetry but are daunted by long and "complicated" poems. It works as a conversation and reads like a collection of haiku.

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