• Title: A Hot Country: (Love and Death In a Hot Country)
  • Author: Shiva Naipaul V.S. Naipaul
  • ISBN: 9780140188349
  • Page: 194
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Hot Country Love and Death In a Hot Country Cuyama a small country in South America its spirit robbed by centuries of conquerors and colonizers is poised on the brink of crisis Shiva Naipaul s passionate and evocative novel focuses on two ca
    Cuyama, a small country in South America, its spirit robbed by centuries of conquerors and colonizers, is poised on the brink of crisis Shiva Naipaul s passionate and evocative novel focuses on two casualties of Cuyama s post Independence malaise, Aubrey St Pierre, dedicated to redeeming the sins of his slave owning ancestors, and his wife, Dina While Aubrey sits in hisCuyama, a small country in South America, its spirit robbed by centuries of conquerors and colonizers, is poised on the brink of crisis Shiva Naipaul s passionate and evocative novel focuses on two casualties of Cuyama s post Independence malaise, Aubrey St Pierre, dedicated to redeeming the sins of his slave owning ancestors, and his wife, Dina While Aubrey sits in his highbrow bookshop composing protest letters to The Times in London and New York, Dina stands aloof and passive in the face of an impending tragedy that seems to her personal than political The fate of their marriage comes obliquely to reflect the fate of a nation, portrayed by Naipaul with intense sympathy, vision and eloquence.

    One Reply to “A Hot Country: (Love and Death In a Hot Country)”

    1. پرسـید: تا حالا سعی کرده اید چــیــز بنویسـید؟"داینا گفت: نه. هیــچ‌وقــت.تا خودتان آزمایش نکنید ، رنجی را که لازمه‌ی کار خـلاقه است درک نمی کنید!چه جــان کنـدنی! چه درد و رنجـی "درست مثل این است که بخواهید ســنگـی را بچـلانـید و ازش خــون بگیریددر این کتاب، نویسنده یک کشور خی [...]

    2. Subdued story of political and personal tyrannies in a fictional Caribbean coastal country named Cuyama (almost certainly Guyana, given the mixture of African and Indian descended populations), written by V.S. Naipaul's not so famous brother. A dictatorial president prepares to hold a sham plebiscite which will effectively hand him sole rule without constitution, as an english journalist called Alex visits his old university friend Aubrey St. Claire, a descendant of one of the countries once wea [...]

    3. Naipaul's final novel before his early death is ser in a country on the right shoulder of South America, thinly disguised a Cuyana. As if the author may have sensed that this was a valedictory work, it is sombre and doomed.It is a portrait of a decaying marriage in a decaying country. Dinah, a 22-year-old English literature graduate (of Cuyana University) finds employment with Aubrey St Pierre, the owner of a boo store that sells few books, and falls into marriage with him. Alex, a former underg [...]

    4. This is a very nice book to read, and one got the feeling that a talented director might be able to make a very good film out of it.The book speaks of the legacy that colonial empires leave on their distant subjects. It is set in the fictional country of Cuyama, somewhere in South America. It must be noted that Naipaul hails from Trinidad – not too far from Guyana. The author gives us a peek into the emotional and intellectual impulses of the middle class in this part of the new world. These a [...]

    5. This novel uses the marriage of Aubrey and Dina to reflect upon the tensions felt in post-colonial Cuyama (I've seen some here equate Cuyama with Guyana; I get the feeling that it's more representative of Grenada's development into a Marxist state in the early '80s). Aubrey is trying to keep his place in the country's social fabric while he attempts to atone for the sins of his ancestors. Dina is poised between the plight of the non-white natives and the former privilage of the colonizers reflec [...]

    6. This novel is set in a fictional island nation, Cuyama, in the throes of a revolution. The physical, political, and social heat is palatable in this narrative. Shiva Naipaul's beautiful prose illuminates this fictional post-colonial nation. The dirt, sweat, lush jungle, smell of night blooming jasmine, racial tension, and decay are all expertly transferred. This short beautifully written novel transports the reader to a place that may or may not exist. The struggles of the diverse population of [...]

    7. A novel set in a fictional country, but so apparently modeled on Guyana I read it as such. The main character is a citizen of a newly independent country but descended from the old colonial masters. Guilt ridden, he atones for the sins of his family by operating an unprofitable bookshop in the capital city, by marrying a woman descended from indentured servants almost as a project for her intellectual betterment, and – in short – by stubbornly refusing to leave the country even as it descend [...]

    8. Was on my list forever. It's a short, but good portrayal of the third word and the racial/class/post-colonial issues. Since I lived in that kind of environment when this was written, I liked: the main character and how he tried to explain/inculcate the differences between races. I didn't like: his wife's role wasn't fully enriched until very late in the novel, but that must have been by design.

    9. This book was good. It was well written and it had a point. But the meaning of this book was meaninglessness. Which was sort of depressing. It was all about how miserable the heat made everyone, and how the husband was an idiot, and the wife hated herself.

    10. This took me forever, and I have no idea why. It's not long, it's not complicatedI was probably just in an intellectual funk.

    11. A good light read. Shiva Naipaul has a way with creating beautiful descriptions. The character development, I felt, could have had more substance, but otherwise, a good book.

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