• Title: What Christians Ought to Believe: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine Through the Apostles’ Creed
  • Author: Michael F. Bird
  • ISBN: 9780310520924
  • Page: 180
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What Christians Ought to Believe An Introduction to Christian Doctrine Through the Apostles Creed Modern Christians have often hesitated to embrace the ancient creeds because of our nothing but the Bible tradition In What Christians Ought to Believe Michael Bird opens our eyes to the possibilities
    Modern Christians have often hesitated to embrace the ancient creeds because of our nothing but the Bible tradition In What Christians Ought to Believe Michael Bird opens our eyes to the possibilities of the Apostle s Creed as a way to explore and understand the basic teachings of the Christian faith.Bringing together theological commentary, tips for application, and meModern Christians have often hesitated to embrace the ancient creeds because of our nothing but the Bible tradition In What Christians Ought to Believe Michael Bird opens our eyes to the possibilities of the Apostle s Creed as a way to explore and understand the basic teachings of the Christian faith.Bringing together theological commentary, tips for application, and memorable illustrations, What Christians Ought to Believe summarizes the basic tenets of the Christian faith using the Apostle s Creed as its entryway After first emphasizing the importance of creeds for the formation of the Christian faith, each chapter, following the Creed s outline, introduces the Father, the Son, and the Spirit and the Church An appendix includes the Apostles Creed in the original Latin and Greek.What Christians Ought to Believe is ideally suited for both the classroom and the church setting to teach beginning students and laypersons the basics of what Christians ought to affirm if they are to be called Christians.

    One Reply to “What Christians Ought to Believe: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine Through the Apostles’ Creed”

    1. I would highly recommend this book for teaching parishioners the fundamentals of our faith. It is clear, concise, and just fun to read.

    2. Michael Bird has crafted an engaging, accessible, thought-provoking introduction to Christian doctrine that has become my favorite theological read of the year thus far. Using the Apostles' Creed as a starting point, Bird focuses on the doctrines that unify all Christians across all denominations, a refreshing angle in an age of increasing sectarianism. While introducing no new doctrine to me (thankfully), what this volume did was revitalize my view of essential Christian doctrines in a way that [...]

    3. I read this book alongside Alister McGrath and Ray Canatta's works on the Apostles'Creed. Of the three, I thought Bird's was the best. He utilized a wide variety of sources and brought then together in a way that flowed very well. He exhibited in his writing what the Creed is meant to do in its existence--unite Christians of all stripes around the core teachings of Scripture. As someone who was raised to reject the creeds of men, Bird's apologetics in the introduction for why we need the Creed w [...]

    4. The book is a good introduction to the Apostle's Creed. However, I would have given it a higher rating than 3 stars if the author did not continue to view Roman Catholicism as just another genuine stream within Christianity.

    5. [Note: This book was provided free of charge by BookLook/Zondervan in exchange for an honest review.]Although the Apostles’ Creed is, perhaps not surprisingly, not apostolic, as the received text we have of it is from 700AD or so mostly through corrupt Roman sources, the creed itself is one that I could honestly agree to, even if what I meant by it would not be what the author means by it in the slightly more than 200 pages of this book. The creed itself reads as follows, at least in the versi [...]

    6. Good book but could have been better if it had focused more on Biblical teaching and less a logic.

    7. Michael Bird asks the question, "Why has the Evangelical Protestant Church moved away from using Biblical Creeds in their worship services?" Actually that is my paraphrase of what I think the central thought of the book is addressing.Bird focuses on The Apostles Creed and gives a great history of how and why it came into being. He talks also about how accurate it is in giving an excellent summary of why we believe the things we believe. He also shares his thought of how reciting the Apostles Cre [...]

    8. In What Christians Ought to Believe, Bird takes a detailed look at the importance of Apostles’ Creed both in terms of picking apart the deeper complexities and meanings within each statement of believe, but also looking at creeds as a whole as an important historical tool to mark out God’s community of Christian believers.The Creedal statements are clarifications of what specifically it is we believe about the bible, its contents and the persons within. Bird walks us through the historical r [...]

    9. Creeds have functioned as educational instruments in the life of the Christian Church since its inception. One of the most formative of such Creeds, especially within early Christianity was the Apostles’ Creed. It is here that orthodoxy concerning the basic beliefs of the Christian faith has been both preserved and passed to subsequent generations. In What Christians Ought to Believe: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine through the Apostles’ Creed, respected New Testament scholar Michael F [...]

    10. My Rating – Must ReadLevel – Medium length, fairly easy and does not require more than a basic knowledge of the Bible or Theology.SummaryThe book is essentially an exposition of The Apostles' Creed. That is, he goes line by line and explains why we believe it and where the proofs are in Scripture. The first chapter is spent on explaining what exactly a 'creed' is; which incredibly important, especially for us Americans and non-liturgical Protestants, whom don't use them. The second chapter i [...]

    11. One of the few books on basic Christian teaching that should be on everyone's shelf. Coherent, engaging, and well-referenced.

    12. Bird is concerned that many churches have abandoned the creeds. He argues here that we should make use of the creeds, incorporating them into statements of belief, worship, preaching, and teaching. He focuses here on The Apostles' Creed as a good way to guarantee the integrity and orthodoxy of faith. It, he writes, “is probably the best syllabus ever devised for teaching basic Christian beliefs.” (13) It is easy to read yet profound and is a good summary of what Christians believe.He shows h [...]

    13. Michael Bird's What Christians Ought to Believe: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine through the Apostles' Creed explores, in dazzling array, the beauty and complexity of the simple doctrine of the Christian faith found in the Apostles' Creed.He combines solid biblical scholarship with good historical, churchly theology to ground the Creed in the Scripture's story. He gives practical and political suggestions for how the Creed might impact Church and world; for Bird, the Creed is not a doctrin [...]

    14. Michael F. Bird’s What Christians Ought to Believe: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine Through the Apostle’s Creed attempts to convince college students (the intended primary audience) of the author’s belief in the necessity of creeds and then presents his own theology through the skeleton of what is widely known as the Apostle’s Creed. Using circular arguments, Bird fails on to convince of necessity, though there is a positive argument of a creed’s potential usefulness. Though Bird [...]

    15. Sometimes we don’t see ourselves as part of an unbroken line of faith. Instead, we see our interpretations of the Bible as independent of anyone else’s interpretation and of any other Christian’s beliefs. Yet, history tells us that when we have those feelings and interpretations that we’re incorrect. The very beliefs that we take for granted as being the only interpretation of a Biblical passage are often the more nuanced discussion of Christians almost two millennia before us. How can w [...]

    16. Using the Apostle's Creed as his starting point, the author gives a lightly detailed look at the basic doctrines that make up the belief system we call Christianity. At times I found him a bit pedantic but the teaching makes this well worth the reading. The chapter I most appreciated was "I Believe" which emphasizes that belief is more than just saying a sentence once at a youth rally, and boom! you get to call yourself a Christian forever. I especially appreciated the quote from Danish philosop [...]

    17. Michael Bird, Lecturer in Theology at Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia, is an engaging and prolific author. His latest book, rich in theology—and humor!—uses the Apostles’ Creed as a lens through which to learn about God, Jesus, the atonement, and many other aspects of the Christian faith. Whether you have been steeped deeply in creeds or whether your idea of creeds are that they are useless and outdated straitjackets, this book is for you. Bird shows why the Apostles’ Creed is imp [...]

    18. Excellent exploration of the doctrines found in the Apostles Creed. Bird is a very well-read scholar and an interesting writer. There are suggestions at the end of each chapter to explore the various doctrines in more detail. I found his chapter on the resurrection particularly good. We talk a lot about the crucifixion, but the resurrection is just as important. Also a good chapter on what the end of the age brings.

    19. First, it needs to be said: this book contains the most NT Wright quotes I've seen outside an actual book by NT Wright. That quibble aside, it earns 5/5 for sheer readability and 4/5 for everything else: content, depth, applicability, and (something I can't say often for theology books) humor. I'll be reading more Bird in the future - and so should you.

    20. Чудесно въведение в християнската вяра през призмата на Апостолския символ поднесено с характерния интересен и забавен стил на Бърд.

    21. Read this for a sermon series I taught on the Apostles' Creed in fall 207. This was the book I returned to most often and served as the framework for the series. Bird is very engaging, humorous (maybe a touch corny-but endearingly so), and energetic. He referenced broadly, especially from ancient sources. I thought this was a wonderful book and I look forward to reading more from Bird.

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