• Title: The Pound Era
  • Author: Hugh Kenner
  • ISBN: 9780520024274
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Pound Era Hugh Kenner s The Pound Era could as well be known as the Kenner era for there is no critic who has firmly established his claim to valuable literary property than has Kenner to the first three decad
    Hugh Kenner s The Pound Era could as well be known as the Kenner era, for there is no critic who has firmly established his claim to valuable literary property than has Kenner to the first three decades of the 20th century in England Author of pervious studies of Joyce, T.S Eliot, Wyndham Lewis and Pound to name a few , Kenner bestrides modern literature if not li Hugh Kenner s The Pound Era could as well be known as the Kenner era, for there is no critic who has firmly established his claim to valuable literary property than has Kenner to the first three decades of the 20th century in England Author of pervious studies of Joyce, T.S Eliot, Wyndham Lewis and Pound to name a few , Kenner bestrides modern literature if not like a colossus then at least a presence of formidable proportions A new book by him is certainly an event.A demanding, enticing book that glitters at the same time it antagonizes The Pound Era presents us with an idiosyncratic but sharply etched skeletal view of our immediate literary heritage The New York Times

    One Reply to “The Pound Era”

    1. Brodsky once said that unless critic and artist share the same "plane of regard," criticism is pointless. Kenner is an ideal elucidator of Pound (and, in other books, of Joyce and Eliot and Beckett) because his erudition and imaginative power are comparable to his subject. This isn't just an example of clairvoyant literary criticism, of seemingly omniscient cultural commentary--it's also a work of art. Kenner is a major stylist. (And to enjoy it you don't have to be into Pound. I'm not. Nabokov, [...]

    2. Here's proof that literary criticism can be sheer joy to read. I might recommend this book for its literary merits alone--Kenner's prose has the depth, precision, and fun of Nabokov's--but the range of learning here is also quite stunning. It's an education. You may not always agree with Kenner's narrative of modernism, but he certainly makes a strong case for the centrality of Pound. As a bonus, you can move on to The Cantos afterwards and commence to make sense of them. I envy those reading it [...]

    3. Like so much of his work, this book is a marvel of style. Hugh Kenner is able to evoke the personalities of the time as lightly as the line drawing that graces its cover. I read this when I was about 18 and not well versed in the various writers and artists he addressed in this work, so really it was more Kenner I was absorbing at the time. This is one of those books I keep meaning to read again, especially since the crowd he describes have remained some of my favorite writers.

    4. When I first read this as a student it blew my mind. Like listening to Jimi Hendrix for the first time. It redefined how I thought I should react to literature and my relationship with it. I hope it does the same for others. I still revisit it - you can't say that about many lit crit creations.

    5. "The forces which produce the branch-angles of an oak lay potent in the acorn." -Ernest FenollosaKenner's own acorn is the chapter titled "The Cantos- 2."Viz: "There is no substitute for critical tradition" a continuum of understanding, early commenced. Remy de Gourmont surmised that the Iliad discovered today in the ruins of Herculaneum 'would produce only some archeological sensations,' interesting exactly as is 'The Song of Roland,' illustrative of some vanished civilization. Precisely becaus [...]

    6. A pell-mell paper chase through the sprawling British & European intellectual and artistic landscape of the early 1900s. One of the most unusual historical compendiums you will ever encounter. Good luck trying to keep up with it. It's a big book; weighty; an extremely challenging mixture of molten elements to mix together and hammer out lines. A rich steel of ideas ricochets and sparks one from another, from paragraph to paragraph and chapter to chapter. Fireworks.You really have to know you [...]

    7. Kenner wrote beautiful prose. He was erudite, he knew his field, and was not only willing to stick his neck out but eager to convert and convince. Reading Kenner reminds me that there was a time when Critics knew about books and had opinions they wanted to convey to readers in elegant and informative prose. This reads at times more like a good story than the monumental work of criticism it is. At least one critic has said that it should really be called the Kenner Era. How much the creation of " [...]

    8. Luminous Details, then, are "patterned integrities" which transferred out of their context of origin retain their power to enlighten us. They have this power because, as men came to understand early in the 20th Century, all realities whatever are patterned energies. If mass is energy (Einstein), then all matter exemplifies knottings, the self-interference inhibiting radiant expansion at the speed of light. Like a slip-knot, a radioactive substance expends itself. Elsewhere patterns weave, unweav [...]

    9. Kenner writes in a quirky, semi-poetic style that can grate on you for awhile, but once you realize he's pulling it off without any apparent affectation (sprezzatura!) one begins to love it. Also, this book is sort of a grab bag of literary criticism, biography (specifically of Pound) and cultural musings. It is spectacularly well done. If I write anything of this scholarly depth and literary grace in my life, I will be well pleased with myself as an academic.

    10. I put off reading this for years, Ezra Pound not seeming to me worth all those pages. I was wrong. Though Kenner didn't sell me on Pound necessarily, I am more appreciative.

    11. Another stone-cold masterpiece. It's turning into a good year for my relationship with book technology.

    12. As a youth, Ezra Pound aspired to know everything that could be known about poetry. Nearly seven decades later, his lifework culminated in a last book, tellingly entitled Drafts and Fragments, and he wondered where he had gone wrong.Hugh Kenner chronicles these decades in this thick book, weighty with bone and sinew. In the course of it, he makes a convincing case that his title, The Pound Era, is a fitting description of what passed for modern English literature when I went to college. Pound an [...]

    13. Five stars for almost everything, but the one-offs which sixty years later keep being repeated are my interest. Where Kenner is right he remains unsurpassed. Where he is wrong he remains the authority which has taken half a century to begin to get beyond. Pay attention to everything except when he pretends to understand anything about Pound's China and Japan, which has nothing to do with Aristototle, for starters.

    14. necessary to any pound specific research. kenner's prose is a delight in the midst of the other academic wastelands. excuse the pun.

    15. hugh kenner's magnum opus, the title refers to western modernism's debt to poundwell worth reading

    16. Kenner's written an expansive treatise on modernist literature. But it's kinda fun to read too.

    17. Just by judging its writing, I would no doubt name Kenner's work as of the highest standard. But, as a critic, I believe that The Pound Era obscures the facts for the sake of its form.

    18. This is a very good book on Pound's Modernism. I must admit I didn't read all of it, but it's one I intend to buy for myself anyway now.

    19. I kind of wanted to punch the author's voice in the face. Doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the book, but still, made my fist feel a little punchy.

    20. A book about modernist literature that surely counts as one of the greatest works of modernism in its own right.

    21. a real barrel of monkeys. Good fun reading, long but breezy and 1st reaction in 1996 similar to the line from HJ about EP being "shocked at his levity"!

    22. The best piece of cultural history I have every read. Kenner is demanding. Expect to think hard.

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