• Title: Plato 1: An Introduction (Bollingen 59)
  • Author: Paul Friedländer Hans Meyerhoff
  • ISBN: 9780691098128
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Plato An Introduction Bollingen PrefacesTranslator s NoteList of IllustrationsEidosDemon ErosBeyond BeingThe AcademyThe Written WorkSocrates in PlatoIronyDialogueMythIntuition ConstructionAletheiaDialogue ExistencePlato s LettersPla
    PrefacesTranslator s NoteList of IllustrationsEidosDemon ErosBeyond BeingThe AcademyThe Written WorkSocrates in PlatoIronyDialogueMythIntuition ConstructionAletheiaDialogue ExistencePlato s LettersPlato as PhysicistPlato as GeographerPlato as JuristPlato as City PlannerSocrates Enters RomeNotes AbbreviationsIndexBibliography of the Writings of PaulPrefacesTranslator s NoteList of IllustrationsEidosDemon ErosBeyond BeingThe AcademyThe Written WorkSocrates in PlatoIronyDialogueMythIntuition ConstructionAletheiaDialogue ExistencePlato s LettersPlato as PhysicistPlato as GeographerPlato as JuristPlato as City PlannerSocrates Enters RomeNotes AbbreviationsIndexBibliography of the Writings of Paul Friedl nderBiographical Note

    One Reply to “Plato 1: An Introduction (Bollingen 59)”

    1. This is the first of a three volume set introducing the works of Plato. One is advised to have read the Platonic corpus first. I read this alongside a course entitled "Plato-Parmenides" taught by Reginald Allen at Loyola University Chicago during the first semester of 1981/82.

    2. Some of my friends think that Plato asserted the existence of another world and of an arcane knowledge about it. I read Friedlander’s book in order to get help in combating such a widely held but gross misconception of Plato’s philosophy. Friedlander was very useful in this regard.Of the twenty-eight or so works attributed to Plato, most are dialogues with Socrates as a character talking with or listening to other philosophers and figures from Athenian life. Three keys to understanding Plato [...]

    3. Part I of this book is excellent. Friedlander covers the main problems readers encounter with Plato’s dialogues, particularly his relationship to Socrates, the use of myth and irony, and whether there is “doctrine” in Plato’s thought. Plato, Friedlander states, “never placed himself in opposition to Socrates; for decades he spoke through the mouth of Socrates. Thus it is quite right – yet not enough – to say that the written works of the pupil are a monument of gratitude to the tea [...]

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