• Title: Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions
  • Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge James Engell B. Winer
  • ISBN: 9780691018614
  • Page: 114
  • Format: Paperback
  • Biographia Literaria Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life Opinions Biographia Literaria has emerged over the last century as a supreme work of literary criticism and one of the classics of English literature Into this volume poured years of speculation about the c
    Biographia Literaria has emerged over the last century as a supreme work of literary criticism and one of the classics of English literature Into this volume poured 20 years of speculation about the criticism and uses of poetry and about the psychology of art Following the text of the 1817 edition, the editors offer the first completely annotated edition of the highly Biographia Literaria has emerged over the last century as a supreme work of literary criticism and one of the classics of English literature Into this volume poured 20 years of speculation about the criticism and uses of poetry and about the psychology of art Following the text of the 1817 edition, the editors offer the first completely annotated edition of the highly allusive work.

    One Reply to “Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions”

    1. Poor Coleridge. It's impossible to go against the almost unanimous judgment of his contemporaries regarding his brilliant intelligence and conversation. But the reality is that he never, ever was able to make that intelligence and brilliance as productive as it should have been. And as can be attested by some others who have been opium slaves (some, not all, viz: DeQuincey, Burroughs et al.), Coleridge's serious and life-long addiction to laudanum is most probably the cause. And so we have Biogr [...]

    2. An absorbing read as Coleridge seeks a philosophical foundation for his aesthetics. He mounts a convincing defense of Wordsworth's poetic genius and a withering attack on his poetic theory. An impressively serious intellectual endeavor written in the trail-blazing form of an intellectual autobiography.

    3. From TBR List. Oh, Coleridge. This book is 95% jumbled mess and 5% brilliance. It's not necessarily bad, but others have tackled the same subject previously and done it better. Sidney's treatise on poesie is much more concise and readable; Shelley's also is more succinct--and as a contemporary of sorts, does Coleridge's a huge disservice. Coleridge's letter to himself is long and rambling. It starts with his own literary biography (you know, like the title) but "quickly" devolves into a piecemea [...]

    4. I actually have a 1920's roughly pocket sized hard back Everyman edition of this that I picked up in Powell's in Portland on a visit there.I've browsed around in it a bit and read some excerpts previously. I like it pretty well. It's not as engaging to me as Ezra Pound's literary musings but in much the same vein.I just recently read Wordsworth's Preface to the Lyrical Ballads and intend to follow up by reading Coleridge's thoughts on the matter here.

    5. coleridge, 1772-1834, the romanticism, english poet and critic.originality, unity, and transcendence. a triangle, the poetry, the poet, and the readerthing really new there, right, didn't aristotle acknowledge thellowers, or the lack thereof?only when the poet "diffuses a tone and spirit of unityblends and harmonizes the natural and the artificial" will the triangle be completed by the readerpposes a literate crowdi guess, hey? not those extremists mentioned in the empty chamber?"the power of ex [...]

    6. Samuel Taylor Coleridge completed his Biographia Literaria on September 15th in 1815. A sort of intellectual autobiography, the Biographia contains reflections on wide range of philosophical and literary issues. The work is long and seemingly loosely structured, and although there are autobiographical elements, it is not a straightforward or linear autobiography. Instead, it is meditative, with numerous essays on philosophy. In particular, it discusses and engages the philosophy of Immanuel Kant [...]

    7. In some form of irony, I feel that I lack understanding like, perhaps even more so than, the Coleridge who anonymously writes to himself within this text. This book has opened my eyes and ears to poetry and I am left feeling gratefully more knowledgeable of my ignorance than before.My ignorance is not limited to poetry but also to the classics and contemporaries discussed in this book. Without the editor's footnotes this volume would have been nearly indecipherable to me.Although no review is wi [...]

    8. An important book, but not an easy read, particularly the first half, before Coleridge sets into his thesis about what constitutes poetry (an argument with the preface to Lyrical Ballads, which he persuaded Wordsworth to write), and then critiques poets of his time and of antiquity (including Wordsworth and Shakespeare). Grab a highlighter, but don't expect his prose to be as good as his poetry -- it isn't.

    9. Coleridge's outstanding theoretical inquiry, while occasionally hard to muddle through, remains a brilliant statement of both Romantic sensibility and timeless observations of literature - as well as a real smack-down for William Wordsworth. This is where Coleridge comes into his own, even more so than his literary works.

    10. This is a really important milestone in Liteary history, as it was the first real literary critique. The personal frendship and rivalry between Wordsworth and Coleridge invite the reader to speculate on some of Coleridge's observations and motives; however his insights are well argued and the publication of this work ushed in what we understand today to be Literary Theory.

    11. A mind-numbingly dull and utterly pretentious attack on the poetic principles espoused by my new hero, William Wordsworth. For someone who claims imagination is the poet's highest faculty, he uses very little imagination in his own writing. I'm definitely not a fan.

    12. it took me 3 years to make my way through this, and now that its all said and done, i think they're needs to be an abridged version.

    13. Dense dopey as a laudanum dream, but when a kindly old Coleridge scholar in his last year before retirement forces you to read it through, and then again once more, infinitely rewarding.

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