• Title: The Sutra of Hui Neng
  • Author: Hui-Neng
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 328
  • Format: None
  • The Sutra of Hui Neng The Platform Sutra records the teachings of Hui neng the Sixth Patriarch who is revered as one of the two great figures in the founding of Ch an Zen Buddhism This translation is the definitive Engli
    The Platform Sutra records the teachings of Hui neng, the Sixth Patriarch, who is revered as one of the two great figures in the founding of Ch an Zen Buddhism This translation is the definitive English version of the eighth century Ch an classic.Phillip B Yampolsky has based his translation on the Tun huang manuscript, the earliest extant version of the work A critThe Platform Sutra records the teachings of Hui neng, the Sixth Patriarch, who is revered as one of the two great figures in the founding of Ch an Zen Buddhism This translation is the definitive English version of the eighth century Ch an classic.Phillip B Yampolsky has based his translation on the Tun huang manuscript, the earliest extant version of the work A critical edition of the Chinese text is given at the end of the volume.Dr Yampolsky also furnishes a lengthy and detailed historical introduction which contains much information hitherto unavailable even to scholars, and provides the context essential to an understanding of Hui neng s work He gives an account of the history and legends of Ch an Buddhism, with particular attention to the traditions associated with Hui neng, quoting or summarizing the most important narratives He then discusses the various texts of the Platform Sutra, and analyzes its contents.

    One Reply to “The Sutra of Hui Neng”

    1. I recommend this book to anyone interested in what Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, or general 'liberation' or 'New Age' is about. Hui-Neng is a fantastic character, more so for his simplicity, his accomplishment, his directness, and the fact of his being a real person. His account of his life and enlightenment, and those who seek but do not attain has something for everyone, the vain, the proud, the stoic, the passionate His view of Buddhism was welcome to me because, as he says, we find Buddhis [...]

    2. It feels weird assigning a rating to a book that enjoins you to abandon preferences, butwhat the hell. THE PLATFORM SUTRA OF HUI-NENG contains some true gems of instruction. The consistent theme is that we must each work to discover our own buddha-nature; no one can do this work for us. The text itself, however, declines in quality after the main section, as it consists mainly of sectarian material added after Hui-neng's death to defend his "Southern School" teaching against that of Shen-Hsiu's [...]

    3. This book is also called The Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch, since Hui Neng was the sixth and last Patriarch of Zen/Chan Buddhism in China. (He chose not to name a successor). It is a collection of lectures he gave and conversations he had, compiled I don't know when. Hui Neng himself was illiterate. The message actually seems really similar to the modern Zen book I read, The Three Pillars of Zen (Hui Neng is from the Tang dynasty): remember that Buddha-nature is you, don't start thinking [...]

    4. Edit: traditionally ascribed to Huineng or his "disciple" Shenhui. Yampolsky's got some great introductory material on sources and manuscripts, etc. AND, in the back, it comes with a critical Dunhuang manuscript in the Chinese, so you can chant with your friends.

    5. This was far too scholarly for me - i'm looking for spiritual guidance vs theoretical buddhism - or I'm just not there yet!

    6. I've appreciated Red Pine's translations up to now. I like in particular how the sutras are first presented then explained through multiple lenses, first commentary on its meaning, then textually across the many translations then finally in line by line readings almost anthropological in quality drawing us back to the early years of Buddhism. Red Pine treats all of these facets in his little gems. I have to say nonetheless that the Platform was less agreeable in the shift between these different [...]

    7. The Platform Sutra is one of the basic texts of the Chinese Zen school of Buddhist practice. As such it's regarded as sacred by some adherents who may not appreciate the book being subjected to the methods of historico-critical analysis that we find in this book. It's a very scholarly work -- even containing in an appendix a copy of the complete Chinese text of the Tun-huang version of the book. It's not a book for the casual reader (or the non-casual reader who happens to be in a casual mood). [...]

    8. This is a translation of a specific version of the Platform Sutra. The version translated is earlier than the one typically used for the other popular translations. It therefore it may seem unfamiliar to some readers. On the other hand, it is probably closer to the doctrine of 8th century Ch'an than the 16th century version usually used for preparing translations. It is copiously footnoted and includes the author's reconstructed Chinese. The introductory material is strictly academic about the t [...]

    9. I know this is a core book for Zen Buddhism, but it's only a slightly above average read for me (content is superb, but presentation is, well, lacking). It was a big deal to have a work entitled a "sutra" back in those days (roughly 9th C. CE, if memory serves me correctly). That is because until then, a sutra was any direct recording of the Buddha's words. So this was the first work to have that title centuries after the first ones were recorded. Keeping that in mind, I appreciate the message, [...]

    10. I read this in anticipation to traveling in the area where the manuscript had been discovered - in the Mogao Caves of Dunhuang, northwestern China along the ancient Silk Road. Yampolsky's introduction is seemingly exhaustive and provides a rich history of how Buddhism entered China and developed as Chan Buddhism (Zen) and how Hui-Neng's (6th Patriarch, early Tang Dynasty) interpretations and school represented a turning point in the development of Chan. I was slightly disappointed that in the cu [...]

    11. This is a well-written, cutting-edge scholarly research on Chinese Chan and the Platform Sutra. It is very helpful for my research. I think it might also be good to the Chan practitioners. After all, although Dharma is formless, the way it expresses itself through history in this world is nothing but form, and through the making of the Chan legends we could clearly see how the human defects come into the play through all kinds of doors.

    12. He was poor and went to work at the mill grist for 8 years, then he wrote a poem on the West wall, and the Fifth Buddah pronounced he was the 6th Buddah and also given a robe.The instant you see into your own nature-this is the True Buddha. Starting to meditate tomorrow every day at 10:00 am to see into my own nature.

    13. So far, kind of dry, but I think it's mainly because the names are so challenging. It's like trying to chew raw, rolled oats and peanut butter, know I'm probably saying them wrong and it is very distracting. Written for an audience probably more versed than I in Chinese culture and language,his passion for this work still shines through his eruditionI'll keep going.

    14. I read this about a year ago. I really liked it, and re-read parts of it often. I posted a review after I read it on Epinions. The Platform Sutra - The Zen Teaching of Hui-neng

    15. Another Great One From Red PineThe best summary of Hui Neng's teaching yet. A bonus is many teachings of Buddhism. I am recommending it to all who appreciate the words of The Sixth Patriarch.

    16. 4/14/15. I am reading this with the Yellow Springs Zen Group. I joined the reading process late, and I am behind still. It is a hard read that - for me - requires an study effort.5/15/15. On hold. Moving it back to "to-read."

    17. Don't get any other translation! Thomas Cleary absolutely mystifies these dharma talks reputedly delivered by the great Zen popularizer Hui Neng.

    18. A beautiful translation of Huineng's Platform Sutra with Red Pine's penetrating commentary on the Zen school, dualities, and seeing our own nature.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *