• Title: German Literature: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Nicholas Boyle
  • ISBN: 9780199206599
  • Page: 175
  • Format: Paperback
  • German Literature A Very Short Introduction German literature in all genres and from all historical periods has exerted an enormous influence on the history of western thought From Martin Luther Frederick Schiller and Johann Wolfgang von Goet
    German literature in all genres and from all historical periods has exerted an enormous influence on the history of western thought From Martin Luther, Frederick Schiller, and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann, Bertolt Brecht, and Gunter Grass, Germany has produced an impressive number of great writers and great works In German LiteraturGerman literature in all genres and from all historical periods has exerted an enormous influence on the history of western thought From Martin Luther, Frederick Schiller, and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann, Bertolt Brecht, and Gunter Grass, Germany has produced an impressive number of great writers and great works In German Literature A Very Short Introduction, Nicholas Boyle illuminates the particular character and power of German literature and explores its impact on the larger cultural world Boyle presents an engrossing tour of German literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, focussing especially on the last 250 years He examines key themes like idealism, modernism, materialism, trauma and memory, showing how they have imbued the great German writers with such distinctive voices Indeed, this brief introduction offers broad coverage of German literature, revealing the links between German literature and the German nation, examining the literary and philosophical responses of German writers to social, political, and economic change, and seeking out the connections between Germany s intellectual traditions and its often violent and tragic history About the Series Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life s most interesting topics Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.

    One Reply to “German Literature: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. This was a very concise introduction to German literature from the middle ages up to moddern days. I enjoyed it very much.Enjoy and Be Blessed.Diamond

    2. Serviceable overview. It was a good idea to include Wagner, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer But where are Musil and Broch? Also - and this is rare for me in reading a book about books - I am not inspired to read any of the books he mentions. Overviews should be more inspiring/motivating

    3. Em geral esses livros da coleção "A very short introduction", da Oxford são bem interessantes e cumprem o seu papel de uma vista geral sobre um Uma boa introdução, apesar de breve, da literatura alemã desde Lutero.

    4. There are many routes we can take when giving a brief description of a national literature. We can focus on highlights and personalities, on cultural curiosities and peculiarities or on specific effect of the "terroir" and homegrown mythology of that nation. Readers usually prefer approaches that place the writers and books they admire into a context, that can then serve to lead them to more great books to read. Nicholas Boyle, a Goethe expert and Professor of German at Cambridge University, her [...]

    5. I found this difficult to read, and not very helpful as an overview of German literature. To see my review please visit anzlitlovers/2017/03/12/ge

    6. The book gives an adequate scholarly survey of what has since taken place in German literature, properly speaking, up to the author W.G. Sebald (whose book After Nature (1988, English tr 2002) I read in 2013), whether comprised of reactions to literature elsewhere (English and French, say) or as original projects having distinct German roots (such as Bildung), or having unique German determinations (the works of remembrance and memory and the working of traumas). There are references to poetry, [...]

    7. This book seemed a lot harder to read that I think it should have been. I've been reading a bunch of books from this "short introduction series" , and most of them don't feel like an "introduction" to me. I would expect an "introduction" to mean that it is a fairly easy non-fiction read and easily understandable for someone who has no prior knowledge on the subject, and most of these do not seem to be that way. For this particular one, I was able to follow it for the most part, but it was a diff [...]

    8. In this enthusiastic and detailed overview, Nicholas Boyle closely links Germany literary history to German social and political history, thus providing a fascinating analysis of the subject. I defy anyone to read this without at least wanting to dip into Goethe. On the other hand, the author does let his garrulity get the better of him at times leading to long stretches of somewhat dense and impenetrable prose (many paragraphs spanned multiple pages), but overall this is as low-level an introdu [...]

    9. Not really what I expected.The author took such a judgmental tone at times that I wondered if he actually liked German literature at all. He seemed intent on pointing out how German literature had developed differently than English literature and thus was bad.I have to agree with the other reviewer who said you came away from this book without a feeling that you had found other authors that you might want to read. Boyle made you feel that German literature was a thing best avoided.

    10. So drrrrrrrrrrrrrrryyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyah.I'm going to try it again with more focus but my eyes just slid over the page without taking in any of the words. I didn't learn anything about German Literature, but I won't let it defeat me.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *