• Title: Twenty Jataka Tales
  • Author: Noor Inayat Khan
  • ISBN: 9780892813230
  • Page: 460
  • Format: Paperback
  • Twenty Jataka Tales These twenty tales have been drawn from famous legends concerning the former lives of the Buddha Beloved by children and adults alike they tell of people and animals moved to acts of sacrifice by the
    These twenty tales have been drawn from famous legends concerning the former lives of the Buddha Beloved by children and adults alike, they tell of people and animals moved to acts of sacrifice by the noble example of their fellow creatures The flavor is often suggestive of Aesop, as are the lessons that are so subtly and keenly conveyed.Presented in a simplified narratiThese twenty tales have been drawn from famous legends concerning the former lives of the Buddha Beloved by children and adults alike, they tell of people and animals moved to acts of sacrifice by the noble example of their fellow creatures The flavor is often suggestive of Aesop, as are the lessons that are so subtly and keenly conveyed.Presented in a simplified narrative, the tales maintain the magical and timeless beauty of their Far Eastern origins The stories are ideal for reading to children, as they tell of highly dramatic adventures that are resolved by non violent and compassionate means Challenging circumstances bring forth courage and the capacity to love, opening the way to solutions against seemingly impossible odds.This book will also be coveted for its exquisite illustrations by the well known illustrator H Willebeek Le Mair.

    One Reply to “Twenty Jataka Tales”

    1. Noor Inayat Khan was extremely brave.She was a hero.She also, as is evidenced by this book, a talented writer. When she was killed by the Nazis, France and Britian each not only lost a patriot but the world lost an author.It is impossible not to read this collection and not think of the political climate of Europe at the time the book came out (just prior to WW II) despite the elements of Buudism. Of the twenty tales, most deal with leadership. All deal with scarifice and/or morality. Most deal [...]

    2. Akin to Aesop's fables. Very short tales about being kind and wise. Most involve animals instead of people.

    3. These Indian tales are very intelligent and marvellous, with their own morals and sayings. I have been learning about Ancient India, and little Indian children are meant to be told them too. They are all very good stories about talking animals and amazing kings.The author of this book, who told all the Indian tales for little children, was an Indian princess named Noor. With easy-to-read words and sentences ('and to you, my little ones'), these tales are the perfect ones for six- twelve-year-old [...]

    4. Genre: FablesReading Level: Fluent Topics & Themes: Legends of Buddha.Curricular Use: Read aloudSocial: Self-sacrifice. Love for all creatures. Equality. Qualities of a leader/king. Moral theme of each story. Religion.Literary Elements: Personification: most of the stories feature animal characters. Metaphor. Imagery.Text & Pictures: Each story begins with a black and white illustration capturing a scene from the fable.Additional Notes: Book written by a member of the last royal family o [...]

    5. Summary: This text is a collection of Indian tales. Each story teaches a moral by using the old stories past down from generation to generation.Uses: read aloud (one story at a time over an extend period)Literary Devices: metaphors, rhymes, symbolismSocial Issues: love, equality, service, self-sacrifice, being a kind ruler/leader, being obedient, other religions, different cultures' beliefsOther: This is a great way to introduce other cultures' beliefs into the classroom. The stories provide a l [...]

    6. I saw the Jataka Tales mentioned in an interview with Kristy MItchell, a photographer and artist who published a book called Wonderland. I wanted to know more of the background and stories that inspired her work, so I went to find some. These are wonderful, short tales that are meant to express the many lives of Buddha. Buddha is reincarnated many times, and he can be a king, and animal, or even flowers in a garden, and these are some of the tales of his past lives.

    7. A collection of short Aesop-esque legends of the former incarnations of the Buddha that relates tales of wisdom and kindness. Here he’s a lion, kindly correcting a panicking hare who thinks the world is ending. There he’s an stag convincing the king through his willingness to sacrifice himself for any of his fellow creature that all animals are worthy of respect. The tales are simple and fun & the morals subtle enough to compliment and not overpower the sweet nature of the book.

    8. genre - fictionreading level - 3rd to 5th gradetopic and themes - these tales have come from famous Buddha legends curricula use - read aloudsocial - Moral issues, sacrificeliterary elements - metaphor, symbolism, irony, conflict between characterstext and pictures - each short story has it's own black and white picture to associate with it

    9. Genre- Fiction / Book of FablesReading Level- grades 1-6Topic and Themes- Fables and Moral lessonsCurricula Use- Read aloudSocial- Morals and life lessonsLiterary Elements-Symbolism & metaphor. Book of a variety of tales in which everyone any age can learn from.Summary- "Twenty Jataka Tales" is an excellent book of fables that have very important life lessons in them.

    10. Reading Level- 2-6Genre- Fables/fictionTopic- fables that end with a lesson learnedSocial- moral lessons, sacrifice, love, equalityCurricula Use- read aloudLiterary elements-symbolismSummary- Twenty tales that each teach a moral. Stories that are passed down.

    11. Ok not a level with other similar collections of sufi or sadhu stories but still a good one to read to children.

    12. 4-8fablesread alouds, independent readingshort storiesmany different morals represented in the stories by the last princess of India

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