• Title: No Peace, No Honor: Nixon, Kissinger, and Betrayal in Vietnam
  • Author: Larry Berman
  • ISBN: 9780743223492
  • Page: 190
  • Format: Paperback
  • No Peace No Honor Nixon Kissinger and Betrayal in Vietnam On April when U S helicopters pulled the last soldiers out of Saigon the question lingered Had American and Vietnamese lives been lost in vain When the city fell shortly thereafter the ans
    On April 30, 1975, when U.S helicopters pulled the last soldiers out of Saigon, the question lingered Had American and Vietnamese lives been lost in vain When the city fell shortly thereafter, the answer was clearly yes The Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam signed by Henry Kissinger in 1973, and hailed as peace with honor by President NixoOn April 30, 1975, when U.S helicopters pulled the last soldiers out of Saigon, the question lingered Had American and Vietnamese lives been lost in vain When the city fell shortly thereafter, the answer was clearly yes The Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam signed by Henry Kissinger in 1973, and hailed as peace with honor by President Nixon was a travesty In No Peace, No Honor, Larry Berman reveals the long hidden truth in secret documents concerning U.S negotiations that Kissinger had sealed negotiations that led to his sharing the Nobel Peace Prize Based on newly declassified information and a complete North Vietnamese transcription of the talks, Berman offers the real story for the first time, proving that there is only one word for Nixon and Kissinger s actions toward the United States former ally, and the tens of thousands of soldiers who fought and died betrayal.

    One Reply to “No Peace, No Honor: Nixon, Kissinger, and Betrayal in Vietnam”

    1. Recently I read and reviewed "Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that Led to Vietnam" by H.R. McMaster. It is a detailed account of how the Vietnam conflict was Americanized.Berman's book is a detailed account of how the Vietnam conflict was un-Americanized. It's title could have been "Dereliction of Duty: Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger and the Lies that Led Out of Vietnam."

    2. Many historians would have you believe that Richard Nixon and especially Henry Kissinger were peacemakers who made a good faith effort to salvage the Vietnam War, only to be betrayed by Congress and domestic opposition. Larry Berman's No Peace, No Honor explodes that persistent, pernicious myth from the foundations upward. Berman offers an in-depth look at the peace talks, with Kissinger, Le Duc Tho and assorted South Vietnamese officials butting heads without making any significant progress; th [...]

    3. Tough to read account of a painful, painful moment in American history. Nixon's continual rhetorical emphasis on his strength and "peace with honor" reveals his weakness, and his desire to have peace at any cost, including abandoning the South Vietnamese. No wonder the North Vietnamese stonewalled all through the peace negotiations.

    4. Very interesting and detailed. As a professional negotiator, it seemed that the author had unrealistic expectations for how Kissinger should have conducted the negotiations. Labor negotiations are nowhere near as complex as diplomatic negotiations to end a war, but even in labor talks, Berman's ideal of complete transparency is beyond naive. Interesting peak behind the curtains to an intriguing time.

    5. Outstanding. Berman takes the complexity of the Vietnam issue and makes it an easy read. He tackles the tough issues of Nixon's good cop/bad cop with Kissinger, peace through esculation, and the people of S. Vietnam. If you agree or disagree with Berman's conclusions - it is a good read.

    6. As more records are released and research done we are finding out that some administrations have been more deceitful and self-serving than Americans are wont to believe.

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