• Title: The Silver Trumpet
  • Author: Owen Barfield Josephine Spence Marjorie Lamp Mead
  • ISBN: 9780917665066
  • Page: 455
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Silver Trumpet In this delightful fantasy of kings and queens a magical Silver Trumpet a jester dwarf and castle intrigues English author Owen Barfield has created an enduring tale to captivate the imaginations
    In this delightful fantasy of kings and queens, a magical Silver Trumpet, a jester dwarf, and castle intrigues, English author Owen Barfield has created an enduring tale to captivate the imaginations of all readers This beautifully illustrated edition of The Silver Trumpet, a story which first appeared in print in 1925, contains a helpful biographical note on Barfield byIn this delightful fantasy of kings and queens, a magical Silver Trumpet, a jester dwarf, and castle intrigues, English author Owen Barfield has created an enduring tale to captivate the imaginations of all readers This beautifully illustrated edition of The Silver Trumpet, a story which first appeared in print in 1925, contains a helpful biographical note on Barfield by Marjorie Lamp Mead An entertaining and handsome volume, it will be a valuable addition to the libraries of collectors, families, and schools.

    One Reply to “The Silver Trumpet”

    1. As Owen Barfield's first published book and only work of fiction, THE SILVER TRUMPET is a bit difficult to evaluate. On the face of it we have a story spanning three generations of monarchs in a kingdom the name of which we are never told but whose seat is called Mountainy Castle. The opening chapter introduces us to newborn twin princesses, a nobleman called the 'Lord High Teller of the Other from Which', an elderly woman who may or may not be a witch and may or may not be benign, a newly arriv [...]

    2. From C. S. Lewis's letter to Owen Barfield on June 28, 1936 (in Vol. 2 of Collected Letters): "I lent The Silver Trumpet [originally published in 1925] to Tolkien and hear that it is the greatest success among his children that they have ever known. His own fairy-tales, which are excellent, have now no market: and its first reading—children are so practical!—led to a universal wail 'You're not going to give it back to Mr. Lewis, are you?' All the things which the wiseacres on child psycholog [...]

    3. This is my most absolutely favorite book of all time. I've been reading and re-reading this book since I was about 6, and learn something new every time. More than a fairy tale or love story, it's just a beautifully written story about the importance of being a good and sincere person.

    4. Has a slow start but gets better as the story unwinds. I liked it by the time I finished it and look forward to seeing if it grows in my imagination the way the short works of Tolkien have done.

    5. I was excited to finally get my hands on a copy of this. While I really enjoyed it I found myself wishing that Barfield had tried his hand at the genre of fairy tale again, somewhat later in his career. With that said, this is a lovely book which genuinely adds to the genre without violating it at all. I would definitely recommend it for all lovers of fairy tale.

    6. The Owen Barfield estate has published the text of this story as a PDF on their website along with some photos of illustrations done for the various print editions. I read the PDF version. (If you want a print copy, the Eerdmans second edition illustrations look the prettiest by far.)Having read a crapload of Inklings work including the lesser-known Charles Williams and Barfield himself--including History in English Words and Poetic Diction, I wanted to get this early Barfield work under my belt [...]

    7. This was a fine read-aloud with the kids, but like Owen Barfield's later philosophy, it's entirely quirkly. Oddly paced and with some anachronistic characterizations that remind you that it's almost a century old now, it nonetheless has a bit of charm, novel characters that are both stock and not at the same time, and enough timeless fairy-tale detail to draw you in. It's fun to note the frequent references to dancing if you know that Barfield was part of a dance troupe, of all things. The story [...]

    8. This early work, first published by the author at age 27, will be of interest mainly to Barfield enthusiasts. The story bears the marks, favorably, of a writer acquainted with the psychological interpretation of fairy tales. In general, the writing is very solid, and yet, lengthy as it is, there simply isn’t enough fantastical "color" to the characters and events to give the story much distinction. Hence, The Silver Trumpet is readable fare--a childrens lit. artifact of simpler times--but a bo [...]

    9. One of my kids favorite stories somewhere in between a picture book and a chapter book in length. Rootity tootity toot.I probably read this out loud 15 times.

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