• Title: The Quiller Memorandum
  • Author: Adam Hall
  • ISBN: 9780765309686
  • Page: 417
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Quiller Memorandum You are a secret agent working for the British in Berlin You are due to go home on leave but you are being followed by your own people or by the enemy A man meets you in the theater and briefs you o
    You are a secret agent working for the British in Berlin You are due to go home on leave, but you are being followed by your own people, or by the enemy A man meets you in the theater and briefs you on a plot to revive the power of Nazi Germany You do not believe him, but you remember that one of the suspects mentioned was a senior SS officer you met with in the days whYou are a secret agent working for the British in Berlin You are due to go home on leave, but you are being followed by your own people, or by the enemy A man meets you in the theater and briefs you on a plot to revive the power of Nazi Germany You do not believe him, but you remember that one of the suspects mentioned was a senior SS officer you met with in the days when you were working as a spy in Nazi Germany The next day you make contact with a beautiful girl who may know something Someone tries to kill both of you.Your name is Quiller You are the hero of an extraordinary novel which shows how a spy works, how messages are coded and decoded, how contacts are made, how a man reacts under the influence of truth drugs and which traces the story of a vastly complex, entertaining, convincing, and sinister plot.

    One Reply to “The Quiller Memorandum”

    1. Adam Hall is the careful, meticulous, and patient author of the interesting character/spy, "Quiller". The series of unorthodox novels built around Quiller are extremely odd, as far as espionage fiction runs. 'The Quiller Memorandum' (first in the sequence) was published in 1966 and it was just not common at that time, for an author to make a point of flaunting his own genre's conventions. But his "Quiller" --a cynical and jaded free-lance agent--does just that. As rogue-ish as Len Deighton's 'Ha [...]

    2. No gun.No codebook. No suicide pills.No family. No friends. No name.No flashy cars. No ejector seats.No hidden compartments.No gadgets.No remorse. Next to Quiller, James Bond is a cautions old lady.Originally published in the mid-1960s, the story is a product of it's time Berlin, The Wall, Cold War, still enough Nazis alive for war crimes trials to continue.It's not written like a spy novel, though. It's more lyrical than the usual hard edges and steely glares that are strewn through adventure/ [...]

    3. The Berlin Memorandum, or The Quiller Memorandum as it is also known, is the first book in the twenty book Quiller series, written by Elleston Trevor under the pen name of Adam Hall. The Quiller series is highly regarded by the spy-fiction community, and as strange as it may seem – because I have had most of the books for years – I have never actually read them. I thought it was time to rectify that oversight, and start at the very top.As the novel begins, we meet Quiller at the theatre. His [...]

    4. The Quiller Memorandum is the first of nineteen Quiller spy novels written by Elleston Trevor under the pseudonym Adam Hall; Trevor was remarkably prolific, writing 58 other novels under other names (including hisFlight of the Phoenix), a number of children’s books, stage plays and short stories. Quiller is an “executive” (super covert agent) for the super-secret “Bureau,” an organization so secret that you fear they’ll have to kill you if you read the book. But not to worry! Quiller [...]

    5. I can't NOT begin by saying, "This Is A MUST Read For Every Fan Of The Espionage Genre". The setting is the most shadowy "post WWII Berlin" with the master players lined up against each other - The Brits and The Nazi Heirs.This book introduced Quiller and it's a treat. He works for an unnamed and elusive British Agency, dedicated to hunt down the war criminals. However, in this book, his mission is purely to infiltrate and expose. What took my breath away was the view of the world through the mi [...]

    6. A spy thriller for chess players. A few missteps toward the end so that a few of the twists felt thin and not solidly set up, but overall very nicely plotted and written. I liked that the main character was ornery and tired and smart and still made mistakes and tried to see all possible outcomes at once and fought more against jumping to conclusions and staying alert and clear-headed than he did directly against the villains themselves. I can see where some might find it more exhausting than any [...]

    7. I read a few of these many years ago when they first came out. I recently found and purchased all 19 of the series in hardback and read them serially. The novels are esoteric thrillers, very cerebral and highly recommended.

    8. If you've only seen the somewhat tepid 1966 film starring George Segal which is based on this classic post-WWII espionage novel, don't let it stop you from reading the original. While the rest of the cast (Alec Guinness, Max Von Sydow and George Sanders) are good and Harold Pinter tries hard to turn a very internal story into the visual medium, George Segal is totally miscast as Quiller. The book itself sets a standard for the psychological spy thriller as an agent (code-named Quiller) plays a s [...]

    9. A lot of years ago I read the Striker Portfolio and was pleasantly surprised. I've eventually rewound and come to the first book in the Quiller series. It feels like a bit of an old forgotten series written in the 60s - the books I've picked up are very dated paperbacks. Quiller is a British agent working in Germany about fifteen to twenty years after the end of the second world war. Good old espionage stories. But whereas Bond was all fast cars, women, glamour and clever gadgets, this is much m [...]

    10. aka: The Quiller Memorandum the first in a series of 19 Quiller books. The Quiller Memorandum is detail rich on what it means to be a (fictional) spy. While maintaining a strong narrative, Adam Hall also details such processes as how to deal w/ a tail (not just how to spot one, but how to lead one on, double back on said tail, etc.). Quiller also uses his training to determine what drugs are administered to him during an interrogation, which in turn allows him to know how long he's been under, h [...]

    11. A crisply written story that captured my attention from beginning to end. I was really surprised, because I don't usually like books written during the 50s or 60s. The protagonist, Quiller, is not a superhuman, like the James Bond types, nor does he have a satchel full of fancy electronic tricks up his sleeve. That makes the story much more believable, and Adam Hall's writing style kept me engaged. I read it in two evenings.Cliff Scovellprison-earth

    12. I am listening to this on my ipodYour name is Quiller. You are the hero of an extraordinary novel that shows how a spy works, how messages are coded and decoded, how contacts are made, how a man reacts under the influence of truth drugs, and that traces the story of a vastly complex, entertaining, convincing, and sinister plot.This was an entertaining and interesting storyline and I enjoyed it very much.

    13. This is an espionage series that started in the '60's and ran through the '90's. The Wall Street Journal said it was one of the best espionage/spy series of all time. This was the first book, and I liked it. The book is more focused on thinking as a spy and I found it to be very realistic. I enjoyed the book.

    14. I read on a spy genre blog that Adam Hall was the best. I agree. This book was amazing. Fast, tight, and spiced with a nice twist/reversal at the end. The prose is outstanding, although a bit unique and often tightly clipped. His spycraft is well done and the cliffhangers keep you turning pages. Loved it.

    15. This spy novel about neo-Nazis 1960's Berlin seemed dated and a little stilted to me. But good enough to hold my interest till the end.

    16. The Quiller Memorandum was published during the cold war at a time when film and literature were either having fun with the world of espionage (James Bond) or taking it quite seriously (The Spy who came in from the Cold). Though spy stories go well back (Check out Riddle of the Sands) this was peak period. Like the best of them Quiller is well written; the language is gritty, cold and engaging. Quiller is an interesting guy; he has a conscience but can perform as if he doesn't. The plot, one exp [...]

    17. This 1965 novel started as a subtle and interesting story of an English agent investigating neo-Nazis in Berlin but it eventually became excessively drawn out and uninspired, trying for a Spy Who Came in from the Cold-type effect which it couldn’t pull off. Quiller is a typical 1960s Callan-style spy working as a lone-wolf and gradually uncovering a plot by the German army to restore Nazism through encountering an attractive female who may be a defector from the organisation. Unfortunately it [...]

    18. old school spy drama situated in Berlin as Nazis (back when they were the enemy) and the Communists (ditto) were plotting an attack on the US forces in Berlin. Ah, the good old days.

    19. In 1965, writing under the pseudonym of Adam Hall, Elleston Trevor published a thriller which, like Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale before it, was to herald a change in the world of spy thrillers. The novel was titled The Berlin Memorandum and at its centre was the protagonist and faceless spy, Quiller.The setting is Cold War-divided Berlin where Quiller tackles a threat from a group of neo-Nazis who call themselves Phoenix. Their aim is to bring back the Third Reich. Quiller works for the Bureau, [...]

    20. The Quiller Memorandum finds itself somewhere in the middle of the Ian Fleming school of action, sex and danger and the John le Carre style of a bunch of people talking in an office while nothing much happens, and for the most part it's quite enjoyable, though I still prefer the more fun kind of spy novel. Quiller is a British operative working for a top secret division. He's about to come home from a long station in Germany mopping up escaped Nazis when he's asked by his superiors to investigat [...]

    21. Synopsis/blurbYou are a secret agent working for the British in Berlin. You are due to go home on leave, but you are being followed-by your own people, or by the enemy. A man meets you in the theater and briefs you on a plot to revive the power of Nazi Germany. You do not believe him, but you remember that one of the suspects mentioned was a senior SS officer you met with in the days when you were working as a spy in Nazi Germany. The next day you make contact with a beautiful girl who may know [...]

    22. Adam Hall (one of Elleston Trevor' many pseudonyms) wrote many classic spy stories, and this one is considered one of his best. Apparently, it was made into a classic movie and there is even a website compiled by Trevor devotees. He was the author of Flight of the Phoenix which became a really great movie. His Quiller books have been compared favorably to Le Carre' novels although the first was written before Le Carre' Trevor himself has noted the similarity but claims his Quiller is much less i [...]

    23. Cold War espionage at its best. A taut and tough writing style, and rather complex plot that involves Nazi villains, British agents, a sexy German femme fatale, all taking place Cold War Berlin. A great read.

    24. Quiller MemorandumTwenty years after the fall of the Third Reich, West Berlin remains infested with ex-Nazis. Quiller, an undercover Nazi hunter for British intelligence, reluctantly accepts an assignment to uncover a Nazi organization called Phoenix and learn their plans for starting a non-nuclear World War III that would bring the Reich back to power. Two fellow agents have already died trying to accomplish this objective, and Quiller's superiors are quite certain he will be the third.This is [...]

    25. This is first in series of long running Quiller series by Adam hall which would be followed by 18 other novels spanning a period 3 decades. Set in cold war Berlin, the Quiller memorandum concerns the enigmatic Quiller, an agent working for the ultra secretive "Bureau" based out of London who is sent to investigate the activities of a Neo Nazi organization with nefarious intent. Written as a first person narrative, Quiller Memorandum is an interesting read. However this is not the regular, generi [...]

    26. Written in a minimalist style, but operatic in its events. Quiller is a black box character, a spy whose constant refrain, as he evaluates his back-against-the-wall options is "No go." Being shot at by Nazis? Need to get out the back way, but it's barred? "No go." Lady tries to seduce you but you know she's a double agent? "No go." There's some gender trouble here, as you might expect from a Bond-James-Bond novel written by a man in 1965. There's also some very earnest Freudian-izing, which cont [...]

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