• Title: Great Ghost Stories
  • Author: John Grafton Ambrose Bierce Amelia B. Edwards Charles Dickens Jerome K. Jerome W.W. Jacobs M.R. James E.G. Swain
  • ISBN: 9780486272702
  • Page: 191
  • Format: Paperback
  • Great Ghost Stories Aficionados of supernatural fiction will take perverse pleasure in the hair raising horrors recounted in these outstanding examples of the genre Featuring a gallery of ghostly characters forbidding l
    Aficionados of supernatural fiction will take perverse pleasure in the hair raising horrors recounted in these outstanding examples of the genre Featuring a gallery of ghostly characters, forbidding landscapes, gloomy country manors, and occult occurrences, this spine tingling collection features works by such masters of the macabre as Bram Stoker the creator of Dracula Aficionados of supernatural fiction will take perverse pleasure in the hair raising horrors recounted in these outstanding examples of the genre Featuring a gallery of ghostly characters, forbidding landscapes, gloomy country manors, and occult occurrences, this spine tingling collection features works by such masters of the macabre as Bram Stoker the creator of Dracula , J S LeFanu, Ambrose Bierce, and M R James.The ten classics included in this volume are The Monkey s Paw by W W Jacobs, E G Swain s Bone to His Bone, The Rose Garden by M R James, Dickens s To Be Taken with a Grain of Salt, LeFanu s Dickon the Devil, Stoker s The Judge s Salt, The Moonlit Road by Ambrose Bierce, Amelia B Edwards s The Phantom Coach, A Ghost Story by Jerome K Jerome, and E F Benson s The Confession of Charles Linkworth.

    One Reply to “Great Ghost Stories”

    1. This Dover Thrift Edition makes for good Halloween reading. It consists of ten stories within exactly one hundred pages. The only one of those stoies I have ever read before is W.W. Jacobs's "The Monkey's Paw," which was worth re-reading. Great Ghost Stories is edited by John Grafton, who is responsible for other Dover horror titles. Other than "The Monkey's Paw," I enjoyed Amelia B. Edwards's "The Phantom Coach"; J.S. LeFanu's "Dickon the Devil"; M.R. James's "The Rose Garden"; and E.G. Swain's [...]

    2. -The Phantom Coach by Amelia B. Edwards, 3*: Ehh. Starts off somewhat interesting, but a lot of exposition that goes nowhere.-To Be Taken with a Grain of Salt by Charles Dickens, 4*: It's Dickens people! It's humorous at times and chilling at others. -Dickon the Devil by J.S. LeFanu, 3*: Some parts are creepy, but I would've liked more.-The Judge's House by Bram Stoker, 4*: Pretty creepy-A Ghost Story by Jerome K. Jerome, 4*: Short, but effective.-The Moonlit Road by Ambrose Bierce, 3*: Interest [...]

    3. This book is basically a reprint of the Penny Dreadfuls that were so popular during the Victorian age, but if you are reading this book you probably already know this. I have never been a fan of Charles Dickens. I was forced to read him in high school, as I'm sure we all were, however, I never made it through a single one of his books. You might not have either. But I made it through a short story of his, god damn it, and I still hated it. Our dear friend Charles wrote 'To Be Taken with a Grain [...]

    4. in their time, the late 1800s, these stories would have been mediocre (some) and good (not very good) some. For today's reader, unfortunately, they are rather lame, many even boring. Furthermore, the writing style of the age, with endless sentences 5 lines long and endless expositions for a little twist are just tiring.The only one still holding its ground was, for me, "The Monkey Paw" - WW Jacobs.

    5. I tried to do this properly & read these all alone at night by lamplight. Big mistake. These stories come from the stuffiest era of writing I know of in English. None of them are scary (well, fleeting moments in one or two may pose an exception). I'll paste my individual notes verbatim below, so I might be repeating myself, but this stuff really puts you straight to sleep. They may be 'ghost' stories, but they are not 'horror' stories - which is fine, because the title only indicates the for [...]

    6. It was interesting how diverse this particular genre could be, and all in one book. There were stories that were sad, funny, literary, and downright chilling. Probably the most terrifying story was “The Judge House” written by Bram Stoker, best known for the story Dracula, which spawned a whole genre by itself. There were actually moments in the same story where I laughed almost in the same breath as shuddering from the chill running down my spine. This is likely due to my joy at being scare [...]

    7. I love ghost stories. Ever since I was a kid sitting outside on summer nights telling scary stories with my friends by the dim glow of a flashlight, I have loved creepy tales of all sorts. These days I listen to a lot of creepiness on my phone -- ghost story podcasts, Old Time Radio like Suspense and CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and Creepypasta stories. I am also a sucker for every haunted house or creepily awesome book I come across.My favorite sort of ghostly tale is classic.ow-building psycholo [...]

    8. This book is a selection of many small ghost stories from England and America from 1864 to 1912.I like the fact that the stories are written in this very old English language. To give an example: " I have always noticed a prevalent want of courage, even among persons of superior intelligence and culture, as to imparting their own psychological experiences when those have been of a strange sort"(page13). It is evident that the language isn't the most modern. My favorite story is " The Judge's hou [...]

    9. Short stories is the perfect medium for horror stories. It's concise, holds the suspense, and it keeps you wanting for more. The book contains about 10 or so ghost stories mostly from the 1800-early 1900s, which is right my genre (I love old ghost stories). Notable ones include Bram Stroker's "The Judge's House" and my all-time favorite Sheridan LeFanu's "The Monkey's Paw". Since the stories have been written for more than a century, they're very predictable (especially "Monkey's Paw", whose plo [...]

    10. Since I don't normally write reviews unless I have something specific to say, here's the break down of how I rate my books1 star This book was bad, so bad I may have given up and skipped to the end. I will avoid this author like the plague in the future.2 stars This book was not very good, and I won't be reading any more from the author.3 stars This book was ok, but I won't go out of my way to read more, But if I find another book by the author for under a dollar I'd pick it up.4 stars I really [...]

    11. These are 10 stories from 1864 to 1912, and you can really tell from the language. Although they might work for a bedtime scare, the background in the stories is really noticeable and antiquated. Could be fun if they were modernized. Bram Stoker had one short called 'The Judge's House'a haunted house that a unbelieving student rents. A big, bold rat confronts the student several times, and the evil judge makes his play against the student eventuallyd wins. Another story I liked was 'The Monkey's [...]

    12. A collection of tales from some of the best classic horror authors, these stories will have you laugh, cry and shiver with fear sending chills up your spine long after you've hidden the book away where it can't get you. This collection defines the diversity that can be found within the horror genre and shows that you can scare your reader out of their wits through the subtle use of suggestion rather than through more obvious means. A wonderful collection of tales, a must read for all horror fans [...]

    13. I bought this book for $2 at the Poe House in Baltimore. There's no Poe in it (I already have his collected works) but it does have Bram Stoker, Charles Dickins, Ambrose Bierce, and others, all telling stories akin to Poe. It's a great for Haloween-time or for anyone who likes old fashioned ghost/horror stories. My favorites were The Judge's House by Bram Stoker, The Moonlit Road by Ambrose Bierce, and The Monkey's Paw by WW Jacobs.

    14. A pretty good selection of ghost stories, or horror, from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It's interesting to see how diverse the genre was (and still is). In some of the stories, the horror is more subtle. My favorites were "The Judge's House" and "The Confession of Charles Linkworth." The classic tale "The Monkey's Paw" is also in this volume.

    15. A compilation of horror stories published during late 1800s and early 1900s.These stories are classic, which means a lot of details are given everywhere. Becareful not to get too attached to every detail. A lot of ending paragraphs hold the climax.Stories are nowhere near scary.

    16. Worth it for "The Phantom Coach", "The Judge's House", and "The Monkey's Paw". But all of them are very dated in style, and most are uncomfortably dry. However, for $2.50, I think it is a worthwhile purchase.

    17. A great collection of classics, including "The Monkey's Paw" which I hadn't read in ages -- it was even more wonderful (and truly creepy!) than I remembered.

    18. No blood and guts in these classics but more than a few chills went up my spine. Highly enjoyable.

    19. Most of these stories put me to sleep. But they represent Victorian writing, so I enjoyed that. The last story, "The Confession of Charles Linkworth," was the best.

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