• Title: You Wouldn't Want to Be a Salem Witch!: Bizarre Accusations Youd Rather Not Face
  • Author: Jim Pipe David Antram David Salariya Stephen Haynes
  • ISBN: 9780531208212
  • Page: 396
  • Format: Hardcover
  • You Wouldn t Want to Be a Salem Witch Bizarre Accusations Youd Rather Not Face Humorous Handy Hints that relate directly to the text are provided on each spread High interest topic for children of all ages Draws in even the most reluctant reader with a lighthearted tone and hila
    Humorous Handy Hints that relate directly to the text are provided on each spread High interest topic for children of all ages Draws in even the most reluctant reader with a lighthearted tone and hilarious illustrations The cultures and traditions from ancient civilizations through modern times throughout the history of the world spring to life in the pages of this se Humorous Handy Hints that relate directly to the text are provided on each spread High interest topic for children of all ages Draws in even the most reluctant reader with a lighthearted tone and hilarious illustrations The cultures and traditions from ancient civilizations through modern times throughout the history of the world spring to life in the pages of this series Includes glossary and index Perfect for struggling readers

    One Reply to “You Wouldn't Want to Be a Salem Witch!: Bizarre Accusations Youd Rather Not Face”

    1. Written as a kids book, it is a actually a terrifying journey to the heart of the human soul. Every page is filled with proof the human mind if not rigorously civilized is full of nonsense, jealously, cruelty and murder. I also couldn't help feeling while reading that given the right circumstances there is no doubt our civilization would slide right back into this dark age. The monster at the heart of each human is ready and waiting once the lights go out. That the book tries to be light-hearted [...]

    2. Another great book in this series. This one is more gruesome than a lot of the others, but covers the anti-witch fever of the period very well.

    3. This is my informational picture book review:This book is a little long so I would let the students use it as part of independent reading, but the information provided is kid friendly and has little side facts that I even found to be interesting. The pictures are colorful, funny, and provide accurate descriptions of the time period, and are very cartoonish. Some of layout of the book reminded me of a comic book with thought bubbles and word bubbles.This book talks about the Salem trials from the [...]

    4. You Wouldn't Want to Be a Salem Witch! puts readers in the middle of the Salem Witchh trials in the 1600s. As in other "You Wouldn't Want to" books handy hints give readers tips about things they wouldn't want to do and things they should try if they happen to be accused of being a witch. Small "side-stories" give more information about certain important people who have been accused of being witches as well as information on the Puritans, who started the trouble of accusing people of being witch [...]

    5. I thought this book was very interesting, I haven't read a book where I am told what my role is. In the introduction I was told that my name was Priscilla Bishop, and I live in Salem village Massachusetts. It’s a very creative book, but half way through I had forgotten my role. Nevertheless I really liked it, it was interesting, funny, informational, and it had engaging illustrations. I don't know if I would read this to young readers though, in my opinion the torture techniques were a bit too [...]

    6. The 'You wouldn't want to be a' is an excellent set of informational books written in second person that asks the reader random questions about a particular time period in history. Each page of the book contains a descriptive statement about an event that occurred during this particular time period and then the rest of the page is full of interesting facts and vibrant graphics that provide additional information about the topic being discussed. This particular series is a great resource to use a [...]

    7. You Wouldn't Want to be a Salem Witch! provides a fun way to learn about the Salem Witch trials. Picture in book form one of those museum tours, such as the Titanic exhibit, where you're assigned the person and once you've gone through the whole exhibit you find out your fate. That's what this book offers. You start your journey as Priscilla Bishop and before the first page is over your parents have been arrested for witchcraft and the town is going a bit nutty. Will you be reunited? Will YOU be [...]

    8. We've read a few books in the You Wouldn't Want To series and they are informative, creative, humorous at times, and often very stark and uncomfortably realistic about life during the historical period being described. I was a bit nervous reading this book aloud with our girls, considering the number of times that torture, hanging, and being burned alive are mentioned. I didn't sugar-coat or censor the book, but we read it in small doses and talked about the awful things that had occurred in the [...]

    9. This book has a lot of historical information about the Salem Witch Trials. The main text is directed to the reader, and asks the reader to put themselves into the position of one of the children in the town of Salem. The supporting text and little fact boxes provide much additional commentary on the trials and general life in Salem. The cartoonish characters are almost a bit frightening and some of the illustrations and facts are quite graphic, therefore teachers and librarians should be carefu [...]

    10. I read this to grade 4 students and they were creeped out by the gory details and outraged at the shenanigans of the Salem witch trials. Also, I teach in Taiwan and the whole Puritan, Quaker history went whoosh over their heads. I did use the opportunity to book talk about The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth Speare. The pirate read aloud was better for grade 4. I would recommend reading this to grade 5 when colonial history is introduced. Extremely popular series.

    11. We picked this one up to supplement the brief description of the Salem witch trials in our history spine. These books are always a little gory but this particular book was really disturbing. As any book about the witch trials should be. I loved that it gave us several different points of view as well as historical references and other times in history witch trials took place. I think this is one of the the best you wouldn't want to be books we have read.

    12. I can't imagine how people could believe that others were witches. We know a lot of this information from movies and other books but this book has so much more. Many places had these witch hunts, not just Salem Ma. And even animals were condemned for being witches familiars. You can find out what happened to some of the people afterwards.

    13. Grim descriptions of a terrifying time told in such a fun, whimsical way! Accusing someone of witchcraft turns out to be a super easy way to get their farm and other stuff. How to get out of being killed - cop to it and they let you go! What a weird time.Illustrations are very cool.

    14. Fantastic overview for kids of the Salem Witch hunts of 1692! Useful information about the specifics of the story as well as witchcraft in Europe in the years leading up to the hysteria in Salem. Upper elementary, lower middle school level.

    15. Kids love these books but not me so much. The books are typically too busy and complicated to read.

    16. Nice information in there for children to learn about the witch trials without being scary or violent.

    17. This nonfiction book (part of a popular series) contains great historical information presented in an appealing format for elementary aged children.

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