• Title: Textual and Literary Criticism
  • Author: Fredson Bowers
  • ISBN: 9780521094078
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Paperback
  • Textual and Literary Criticism The literary critic tends to think that the textual scholar or bibliographer happily occupied in his travel drudgery has not much to say that he would care to hear so there is a gulf between them P
    The literary critic tends to think that the textual scholar or bibliographer, happily occupied in his travel drudgery, has not much to say that he would care to hear, so there is a gulf between them Professor Bowers advances to the edge of this gulf and says several forceful things across it they turn out to be important and interesting, though occasionally scathing TheThe literary critic tends to think that the textual scholar or bibliographer, happily occupied in his travel drudgery, has not much to say that he would care to hear, so there is a gulf between them Professor Bowers advances to the edge of this gulf and says several forceful things across it they turn out to be important and interesting, though occasionally scathing The first chapter reminds us that the literary critic can only criticise with confidence when the textual critic has established what the author wrote Professor Bowers indicates how very much has yet to be done The second chapter takes a particular case, Walt Whitman s copy for the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass, and shows how the bibliographer can, by ingenious but rigorous deduction, give an insight into the growth of an author s conception of the nature and aim of his work The other two lectures, on Shakespeare and other early dramatic texts, will show non specialists the striking advances in editorial technique, and the growth of standards of scholarship in these studies.

    One Reply to “Textual and Literary Criticism”

    1. The most surprising thing about this text is how close Bowers gets to the arguments and trains of thought that D. F. McKenzie and Jerome McGann would eventually pick up and use to radically reshape textual scholarship. It's otherwise classic Bowers, and informative.

    2. A revolutionary work that remains fresh even after fifty-three years' passage. A must read for those following the eBook vs. print book debate. Bowers digs deep into the history of texts and how printing errors sometimes created embarassingly wrong interpretations of literary works.

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