• Title: Forgetting the Alamo, Or, Blood Memory
  • Author: Emma Pérez
  • ISBN: 9780292721289
  • Page: 383
  • Format: Paperback
  • Forgetting the Alamo Or Blood Memory Runner up Best Historical Fiction in English Latino Book Awards Competition This literary adventure takes place in nineteenth century Texas and follows the story of a Tejana lesbian cowgirl aft
    Runner up, Best Historical Fiction in English, Latino Book Awards Competition, 2010This literary adventure takes place in nineteenth century Texas and follows the story of a Tejana lesbian cowgirl after the fall of the Alamo Micaela Campos, the central character, witnesses the violence against Mexicans, African Americans, and indigenous peoples after the infamous battlesRunner up, Best Historical Fiction in English, Latino Book Awards Competition, 2010This literary adventure takes place in nineteenth century Texas and follows the story of a Tejana lesbian cowgirl after the fall of the Alamo Micaela Campos, the central character, witnesses the violence against Mexicans, African Americans, and indigenous peoples after the infamous battles of the Alamo and of San Jacinto, both in 1836 Resisting an easy opposition between good versus evil and brown versus white characters, the novel also features Micaela s Mexican Anglo cousin who assists and hinders her progress Micaela s travels give us a new portrayal of the American West, populated by people of mixed races who are vexed by the collision of cultures and politics Ultimately, Micaela s journey and her romance with a black American Indian woman teach her that there are no easy solutions to the injustices that birthed the Texas Republic.This novel is an intervention in queer history and fiction with its love story between two women of color in mid nineteenth century Texas Perez also shows how a colonial past still haunts our nation s imagination The battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto offered freedom and liberty to Texans, but what is often erased from the story is that common people who were Mexican, Indian, and Black did not necessarily benefit from the influx of so many Anglo immigrants to Texas The social themes and identity issues that Perez explores political climate, debates over immigration, and historical revision of the American West are current today.

    One Reply to “Forgetting the Alamo, Or, Blood Memory”

    1. Well. I did not enjoy this, essentially, at all. The protagonist annoyed me more than I thought I could ever be irritated by a fictional character. Also, there was this weird thing where the author would try to end the chapters with foreshadowing, but it was really just a statement that the main character was too naive to know that something dramatic would happen later on in the story. There was also an immense amount of side characters who got introduced in the same manner over and over again, [...]

    2. This book was great. I usually don't go for historical novels, but there was something about this book that just grabs you once you start reading, and you just have to keep reading. The writing is fantastic, which helps a ton, of course. The style of the book is sort of a picaresque novel, like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, only much better. The main character is a strong, flawed, "wild west" woman, and she's riding her horse all over "Tejas" and into New Orleans to get revenge for the mur [...]

    3. I had to read this book for my WGS course and I really enjoyed it. This book contains a lot of violence and the writing style is different from what one would imagine. The pacing of all the events happening in this book is very fast, sometime skipping over things that other books / authors would not ignore so easily. Journeys that last for days have been written in one-two sentences. Characters randomly/ magically meet throughout the book at various instances at different places which, in my opi [...]

    4. Wonderful idea for a novel, but not great storytelling. Even at just over 200 pages, a slow read for me. Chicana/o land ethos, queer identity, western genre tropes are the biggest themes. A melodrama, even though it doesn't want to be--it mentions that history is too complex to be two-sided, yet all whites are villains and all women are victims and/or heroes. A number of other inconsistencies or unnecessarily confusing parts or storyline (did Campos fight with or against Houston's forces?). Of a [...]

    5. I really liked the plot of the book. I think re-imagining protagonists in history that would today read as queer is incredibly important work. Also as a native to South Texas, I must say it's incredibly refreshing to read a story that explores how the new white groups who were the catalyst of the Republic of Texas were colonizing forces and not heroes. However, the writing style was difficult to read. While I can admire the text for it's academic merits, the art of how it was related needs some [...]

    6. Read this for my graduate Multicultural Lit course. Perez has created a great story that all readers can relate to in terms of memory and repression. The theme of running either to something or away from something is prevalent and can be realized in all the characters. The story provides a history of Mexico, before and after the border was moved to its present location. As well, more profoundly Perez tells the truth behind the Alamo (Mexican's were also slaughtered), which is something that is n [...]

    7. This was a good story, but the writing wasn't the best. Still very much appreciate all the research/historical facts that went into the making of the book, tells a side of Texas/American history that doesn't get acknowledged/retold nearly often enough.

    8. Kind of a strange, rambling little story but not a bad one. Interesting but meandering plot, great dialogue but weird (non)use of commas throughout the narrative, fun but fairly one-dimensional characters

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