• Title: Nimrod: Ernest Shackleton And The Extraordinary Story Of The 1907 09 British Antarctic Expedition
  • Author: Beau Riffenburgh
  • ISBN: 9780747572534
  • Page: 387
  • Format: Paperback
  • Nimrod Ernest Shackleton And The Extraordinary Story Of The British Antarctic Expedition On New Year s Day a tiny overladen ship called Nimrod set out on the last stage of its journey to the Antarctic The leader of the expedition was Ernest Shackleton who was determined to find fam
    On New Year s Day, 1908, a tiny overladen ship called Nimrod set out on the last stage of its journey to the Antarctic The leader of the expedition was Ernest Shackleton who was determined to find fame and fortune by becoming the first man to reach the South Pole On this expedition, Shackleton would record the greatest achievements of his career and make some of his mostOn New Year s Day, 1908, a tiny overladen ship called Nimrod set out on the last stage of its journey to the Antarctic The leader of the expedition was Ernest Shackleton who was determined to find fame and fortune by becoming the first man to reach the South Pole On this expedition, Shackleton would record the greatest achievements of his career and make some of his most momentous decisions It was to be an epic and dangerous adventure While one team battled hundreds of miles to plant the Union Jack at the South Magnetic Pole, Shackleton led another team toward the geographic South Pole Despite being plagued by hunger, cruel weather and unseen crevasses, they persevered to within ninety seven miles of the Pole But things were to get even worse

    One Reply to “Nimrod: Ernest Shackleton And The Extraordinary Story Of The 1907 09 British Antarctic Expedition”

    1. More than just an account of the British Antarctic Expedition of 1907-09, this book is also the biography of Ernest Shackleton from his birth through that important exploratory voyage. I found the account of his childhood and education interesting for the light it shed on his personal characteristics and the training he had experienced prior to the voyage in question. Riffenburgh herein also describes the zeitgeist of Victorian Britain, its values and aspirations and the ways in which its imperi [...]

    2. What at first appeared like a tedious 300+ page historical account of an explorer's failed efforts in a mercilessly cruel environment turned out to be quite the page-turner for the last 100 pages or so. One of Shackleton's claims to fame was that he never lost a team member in any of his Antarctic adventures, and though it looked like many could've perished in several different close calls on this expedition, they all made it out alive despite not achieving their quest for the South Pole. But to [...]

    3. I found this book to be eminently readable. As a longtime fan of Shackleton, I found that I learned a good deal more about the man than I thought I already knew. A must for fans of exploration and the Antarctic.

    4. A remarkable story of determination, hardship, and both moral and physical courage under extreme conditions, which in the end earned Sir Earnest Henry Shackleton both international acclaim and a knighthood, despite having failed to acheive its ultimate goal of planting the British flag at the South Pole.Shackleton's decision to turn back 97 miles short of the pole was recognized as exemplifying both his own moral courage and his dedication to preserving the lives of the men in his charge. Shackl [...]

    5. “For scientific discovery give me Scott; for speed and efficiency of travel give me Amundsen; but when disaster strikes and all hope is gone, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.” This book details the British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909, which reached Farthest South at the time. However, Shackleton and his party turned back 97 miles from the pole, which would later be eclipsed by Amundsen and Scott in their race to the pole three years later.It is also a biography of Shackleto [...]

    6. I found this book discounted in a bookshop in Nelson, British Colombia and bought it having an interest in both nautical subjects and Antarctic exploration. It is a good read, and the author avoids too much technical detail, although if I read it again I think I might lake a list of the characters so that I always knew which group they were part of.Beau Riffenburgh makes much of the fact that Shackleton turned back 97 miles form the pole because he was interested in keeping his guys alive. A jok [...]

    7. I liked this book because it isn't just an excellent account of Shackleton's most important expedition but provides the reader with much more insight in the whole context and zeitgeist of this period of initial antarctic exploration. Beau Riffenburgh starts with Ernest Shackleton's childhood and describes in much detail his upbringing and and years as a young man. Victorian Britain and all of its values becomes alive in this book and many of the actions and motivations of characters in the book [...]

    8. Really enjoyed this. I've read about Endurance many times but this is the first time I read in detail about the Nimrod expedition. Lots of background and a real feel for Imperial Victorian and Edwardian times. Particularly good on the story of Scott v Shackleton, though the author is certainly somewhat biased. That said it's certainly not uncritical of Shackleton in many areas. The expedition itself is brilliantly detailed and brought to life. The staggering achievements are almost unbelievable [...]

    9. Not especially well written. The author has an annoying (to me) habit of writing such statements as, "Perhaps this contributed to Shackleton's sense of adventure." He does this over and over again in the first quarter of the book, writing about England as Shackleton was growing up. Just took too long to actually address the expedition. When he did so however, the story moved quickly along, really drawing me in to the story.

    10. This book tells the story of one of the great Antarctic expeditions - Shackleton's attempt to reach the South Pole. It is a story well told. The author gives a lot of context before he gets to his main topic. Some of this is very good - it gives more analysis of the culture than any other book I've read on expeditions of the time. But it does seem almost like a complete biography of Shackleton's life up to his Nimrod expeditition, rather than actually a book on just the expedition.

    11. Interesting, detailed, well-researched background on Shackleton's second trip to Antarctica. Lots of background details on the milieu of the era and from the private journals of the men. Shackleton's people skills are unmatched, but I want to shake him on his lack of financial skills. And the misery of the whole endeavor. I can barely comprehend the misery.

    12. strangely non-engaging. I didn't feel close to the subject, Ernest Shackleton. An amazing adventure requires more skillful handling. Riffenburgh's prose was not up to the challenge. Still valuable for setting the historical record straight as to who was the most successful Antartic explorer, "Shack" or Scott (it's Shack).

    13. I liked the read. Some incredible luck helped these inexperienced explorers survive. When you think of some of the basic technology and medical knowledge these folks did without what they accomplished is quite incredible. I liked the read overall, clearly be a true Shackleton fan.Overall a solid 3.5 stars.

    14. Loved the way the author was able to keep this book interesting and moving while not drowning the reader in detail. Fascinating bit of antarctic history, with a good overview of the way the world was at the time thrown in to help the reader be grounded in the story. I was fascinated by the car that was used for moving supplies, never realized that had happened.

    15. A concise account of Shackleton's expedition to the furthest south in Antarctica prior to Robert Falcon Scott's tragic quest. Though most famous for the Endurance journey,The British Antarctic Expedition, 1907-1909 was a true scientific conquest which laid the path for both Admundsen and Scott.

    16. am going to read this because the author is my old American Football coach! am always interested in expolartion anyway

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