• Title: History of Florence and of the Affairs of Italy
  • Author: Niccolò Machiavelli
  • ISBN: 9781406801439
  • Page: 493
  • Format: Paperback
  • History of Florence and of the Affairs of Italy Theodoric possessed great talents both for war and peace in the former he was always conqueror and in the latter he conferred very great benefits upon the cities and people under him He distributed t
    Theodoric possessed great talents both for war and peace in the former he was always conqueror, and in the latter he conferred very great benefits upon the cities and people under him He distributed the Ostrogoths over the country, each district under its leader, that he might conveniently command them in war, and govern them in peace He enlarged Ravenna, restoredTheodoric possessed great talents both for war and peace in the former he was always conqueror, and in the latter he conferred very great benefits upon the cities and people under him He distributed the Ostrogoths over the country, each district under its leader, that he might conveniently command them in war, and govern them in peace He enlarged Ravenna, restored Rome, and, with the exception of military discipline, conferred upon the Romans every honor.

    One Reply to “History of Florence and of the Affairs of Italy”

    1. The year 2015 went as expected. This is the last book of this year.Machiavelli was reviled by many for his "evilness" in the Prince. I kind of feel sorry for him, for there is someone who's much more evil than Machiavelli but somehow got away from being totally disgusted by others, because he had won sublime reputation before he showed his truth. Yes, I am referring to THE Plato and the Laws.If one insists on claiming that Machiavelli is a scum because he came up with so many treacheries and man [...]

    2. One of the best written histories of its time; despite some factual inaccuracy it is immaculately well written and a must read for the early modern intellectual historian.

    3. This less-famous work of Machiavelli depicts a medieval Florence, a city garnished with both classical vestiges and Renaissance innovations, a city identified with arts and wealth, a city known for a family -- the Medici family. While the book covered the history of Florence from its very Roman beginning, the main discussion begins with the year 1215, when the Guelphs and the Ghibellines went to war (Interestingly, 1215 was also the year when the celebrated Magna Carta was signed), and ended in [...]

    4. this is a simple direct translation by WK Marriott . The English is current, and complicated clausal interrelations are lain smooth. Rarely does the reader feel unsure of the author's meaning. Not bad for a trade paperback. Now to read it in Italian to see how well it's done. (Not this year)is following quote is not Marriott's but will do just fine to give a sense of the tone overall, it is from some literature network on the internet;:from Book VI "Those who make war have always and very natura [...]

    5. First, it should be noted that this is a political history, and does not address the cultural or arts of the period. I liked it and thought it showed the difficulties of governance in an area and era of factions; and factions are a significant factor in different parts of the world today. Machiavelli’s vies is that it is good and healthy to have differences between parties; the discussions and the checks on powers leads to greater safety and prosperity. When the parties degenerate to factions, [...]

    6. The wisdom that dominates The Prince and The Discourses on Livy merely adorns this text. It is received history, reworked from earlier chronicles, with dense narrative and only brief discussions. We find here not Machiavelli the political philosopher but Machiavelli the literary stylist. In the first half, there are several episodes of high drama: the birth of the Guelphs and Ghibellines in petty family squabbles, the defeat of the tyranny of the Duke of Athens, the Revolt of the Ciompi and the [...]

    7. "If you only notice human proceedings, you may observe that all who attain great power and riches, make use of either force or fraud; and what they have acquired either by deceit or violence, in order to conceal the disgraceful methods of attainment, they endeavor to sanctify with the false title of honest gains. Those who either from imprudence or want of sagacity avoid doing so, are always overwhelmed with servitude and poverty; for faithful servants are always servants, and honest men are alw [...]

    8. Sr. Machiavelli got me right from the first paragraph of this book. He starts his history of contemporary Florentine History (dating from the 1500s) by reaching back to recall the Germanic custom of dividing their population into thirds and sending one third of the people out of the land to find and colonize a place of their own, thus relieving overcrowding in the homeland. Four centuries later, when Hitler was preaching "Lebensraum" to the Nazis, did you know he was recalling millennia of cultu [...]

    9. It's my first book on Florentine history and I know it contains a lot of inaccuracies. On itself the read is pretty enjoyable. Like all those ancient historians Machiavelli narrated history like stories. It contained few dates, which could be confusing but on the other hand saved me the trouble of trying to remember them anyway. He commented amply on the characters and events and it's interesting to see the historian's perspective.

    10. Труд Макиавелли поистине поражает воображение как подробностью, так и рассудительностью. Книга, которуя я несомненно буду перечитывать.

    11. a thorough and -- as far as anything involving Italian politics can be -- balanced history, though the edition I was reading could have done with a livelier translator

    12. Reading the Everyman's Library version, 1922, found today in Hyde Park at O'Gara & Wilson. Original printing 1909.

    13. The somewhat low rating is for the Barnes and Noble paperback edition which lacks the critical apparatus (maps, footnotes, etc.) necessary to get the most out of this complex work.

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