• Title: Europe and the Faith
  • Author: Hilaire Belloc
  • ISBN: 9780895554642
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Paperback
  • Europe and the Faith In this book pivotal to all his historical insights Belloc answers the question What made Europe He shows it was not the barbarians nor the Protestant Reformation but the Catholic Faith that made E
    In this book, pivotal to all his historical insights, Belloc answers the question What made Europe He shows it was not the barbarians nor the Protestant Reformation, but the Catholic Faith that made Europe and the worldwide civilization produced by Europe Protestantism gravely wounded this our civilization, and only the Catholic Faith can rejuvenate it It must returnIn this book, pivotal to all his historical insights, Belloc answers the question What made Europe He shows it was not the barbarians nor the Protestant Reformation, but the Catholic Faith that made Europe and the worldwide civilization produced by Europe Protestantism gravely wounded this our civilization, and only the Catholic Faith can rejuvenate it It must return to that Faith or perish This is a tremendous eye opener on where we are today and where we must go from here

    One Reply to “Europe and the Faith”

    1. Excellent analysis of how the Catholic faith transformed the Roman Empire into the Christendom of the Middle Ages. Many modern historians frame this as a "fall" of the Empire and something new rising to take its place, but Belloc makes a good case for seeing this rather as a gradual transition. He also demonstrates quite persuasively that historians ought to appreciate the precise role of the Catholic Church in those early centuries whether they happen to hold that faith or not. Belloc's view of [...]

    2. This is a good book. I generally agree with Belloc's idea, that the Roman Empire didn't fall, it was just transformed into the Roman Catholic Church, and that the Reformation was a bad thing--Belloc calls it a disaster. But the study of history and especially archaeology have progressed since 1920, so there are some things Belloc can't take into account. He minimizes the barbarian incursions into Europe, for example. While this is done by more modern historians, I think Belloc overstates his cas [...]

    3. I was drawn to Hilaire Belloc because of his being such an influence on GK Chesterton whose writings I have discovered and love. With this book, Belloc gives a concise history of Christendom in Europe, how it influenced civilization in Europe for good, brought Europe through the decay of the Roman Empire having basically drawn from the Roman Empire all that was salvageable, helped preserve civilization and Christianity through the Dark Ages and then with a re-awakening of true spirituality and t [...]

    4. This is an awesome treatise on how Europe was formed on the basis of both the Church and the Roman Empire. It corrects some misconceptions I had of how the barbarians took over the Roman Empire--essentially, these gained roles in the Roman Army and later became administrators on the frontiers as the central Roman authority crumbled. Outside barbarian invasions were always defeated--by barbarians who had been assimilated into the Empire.A very good book to read alongside Belloc's "The Servile Sta [...]

    5. Enjoyed this book, but not as much as I had hoped. It was hard to follow at times due to its more dated writing style. I have not read any other Hillaire Belloc. G.K. Chesterton can also take a good deal of concentration, but I enjoy his sharp wit and amazing ability to cut to the heart of an issue more. I didn't find that with Belloc, at least in this book.

    6. The great Hilaire Belloc in his most paradigmatic work. Brilliant, fascinating and profoundly important for healing our troubled culture. For there will be no healing without understanding our roots the roots of Christendom.I am hoping to review this book in-depth soon at my own website devoted to Christendom, a website inspired by Belloc in large measure Lovers of Belloc may be interested in my archive of posts and reviews dedicated to Belloc:corjesusacratissimum/tag/hMy review when finished be [...]

    7. Very interesting viewpoint. Starts pretty good and then devolves into I'm not sure what, but definitely more of a rant against the Bible's sufficiency, against capitalism and a defense of feudalism and the Renaissance as the height of human civilization. The Renaissance was pro-christian and the Reformation a return to barbarism? I need to find out if this book was written in response to another treatise and read that. perhaps that would give better context to the case, though there is no recove [...]

    8. If the reader isn't catholic I don't think they will be convinced of the author's views but I think every reader- be they catholic or not- will appreciate learning to see how a European catholic would view their own region's history. A useful easy read, especially for those who live in a culture with a non or anti catholic view of history. However it is a very sweeping and generalized history so if the reader has a specific question about Catholic history or is short on time I would recommend it [...]

    9. The book takes a rather sweeping look at history. He goes through each period selecting certain things to help make his point. He desires for brevity as opposed to unnecessary depth. As for a history book, it would work well in a Western Civ course, especially for those in a home school situation. If I were a parent, I would give this to my child as supplementary reading because it corrects so much erroneous thoughts and assumptions regarding European history.

    10. A brilliant though rather short work and in its finality I found to be quite prophetic (this work was written in the early twentieth century). A book that really re -gears the mind in matters of Western history, properly focusing one's understanding of the origins of our Western civilization and where it's heading.

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