• Title: Stealing the Network: How to Own the Box
  • Author: Ryan Russell Timothy Mullen Dan Kaminsky MarkBurnett
  • ISBN: 9781931836876
  • Page: 174
  • Format: Paperback
  • Stealing the Network How to Own the Box Stealing the Network How to Own the Box is NOT intended to be a install configure update troubleshoot and defend book It is also NOT another one of the countless Hacker books out there So what IS
    Stealing the Network How to Own the Box is NOT intended to be a install, configure, update, troubleshoot, and defend book It is also NOT another one of the countless Hacker books out there So, what IS it It is an edgy, provocative, attack oriented series of chapters written in a first hand, conversational style World renowned network security personalities present Stealing the Network How to Own the Box is NOT intended to be a install, configure, update, troubleshoot, and defend book It is also NOT another one of the countless Hacker books out there So, what IS it It is an edgy, provocative, attack oriented series of chapters written in a first hand, conversational style World renowned network security personalities present a series of 25 to 30 page chapters written from the point of an attacker who is gaining access to a particular system This book portrays the street fighting tactics used to attack networks and systems Not just another hacker book, it plays on edgy market success of Steal this Computer Book with first hand, eyewitness accountsA highly provocative expose of advanced security exploitsWritten by some of the most high profile White Hats , Black Hats and Gray Hats Gives readers a first ever look inside some of the most notorious network intrusions

    One Reply to “Stealing the Network: How to Own the Box”

    1. Back from school, discovered excerpt of the Return on Investment chapter on fyodor's insecure. Found a copy to read months after that, read it front to back. My dad had boxed the PC as school exams were coming up. Luckily they kept the box in my room. I used to unpack the P3 850Mhz machine every night and pack it back by morning, roaming around on a dial-up. It was an old CRT on which I read it.It was very exciting in those days as this was a first to keep reality & fiction intertwined nicel [...]

    2. Very interesting concept - instead of being a typical hacker or pen-testing howto guide, it's actually a collection of stories told from the viewpoint of hackers on accessing networks in different ways. I found the stories to be really interesting and enveloping, both from a technical and a true-crime-story kind of way, but many of the personalities of the storytellers left me really irritated - definitely a lot of that "teen hacker" stereotypical attitude of immaturity and arrogance. But still [...]

    3. IT technology. This kind of tech has been developes really fast since the 70's where Arpanet connect the first LAN. Along with the advance, came the flaw - Security. If your private network is your home, than prepare to lock the doors. The book contains some short fiction stories based with real technology. I think this book is not particularly a hackers how to. It is a good book to know how hackers (best ones) would think and do to your network, and by so, helps us improving our defense. I read [...]

    4. addendum 1/12/04: now that I've read 3 books in this series, I have to say volume 2, How to Own a Continent, is by far the best. I'd start with that.Extremely realistic. Good for what it is. Don't bother unless you are ok with pages of unix console logs constituting large parts of each story. That said, this is pretty gripping for the right sort of person. Brian P might like it

    5. This is bad. Really bad. This book was recommended to me by a colleague, but I couldn't get past the first third of the book.Each chapter is written separately. They are all sort of like stand-alone short stories. The authors attempt to show you what different types of network attacks would be like through the use of fiction. I assume that they also try to give you a little knowledge about the subject (even though they claim that's not the point of the book) because otherwise the fiction would h [...]

    6. Solid book written by security/"pen-test" guys. I thought the stories were interesting and present what could be realistic scenarios. It has a good portrayal of the mindset of hackers and their relentlessness.What the book is not: It's not a how to book for wannabe hackers. If you're looking for a guide on how to exploit systems, you'll want to look elsewhere (and my guess is not in a print book as those exploits will surely have been closed by the time you and thousands of others get your hands [...]

    7. This was a fun book to read. It's been a while since I read it, but I do remember enjoying the read. As a technology professional with a security interest, this book is both educational and gives you other things to consider when thinking about the security of a solution you're working on implementing.

    8. (3.0) Good concept, writing could be betterThese aren't connected the way that the stories in Stealing the Network: How to Own a Continent. I agree with Amar: try that.

    9. Great book for the techy person. The stories are interesting, and seemingly accurate from a technical perspective. I really enjoyed it.

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